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La Cage De Poulet Coop

Well, here is my page to show off my coop so otheres can glean ideas from.  If you like this, let me know, if you do not like the coop...  well tough!    Laughing

The start of the coop:

"La cage de poulet"

I am trying to keep the cost down as much as I can so the frame is sitting on preasure-treated wood, but the frame work is not. This is my main worry, but they can be replaced without major re-work if the need be. For now, I will try to keep them painted and dry.

Frame work

After getting the walls up:

Now that the framing is mostly done, I can get some underlayment nailed up to make it look like a coop!   The run will be framed and then fenced with hardware cloth. The roofing will be a tin roof design with the roof over the run as well. 

Up with the walls

Boxing it all in:

Now it is really looking like a coop!  (Pay no mind to the messed up "pop-out" door, I know I forgot to allow for the shavings and will fix that!)  The rear door will have a board that holds the shavings back and can be removed for cleaning.  The "A-frame" of the roof truss towards the run will be part of the main venting. This will have two "windows" that hinge open and allow a mass air flow into the coop.  The hole under the coop leads to the "cold shelter" where they can get out of the wind or blowing rain. There will be a hinged screen door on the left side under the coop. This will also get a "storm window" for the winter time.  The nest boxes can be seen on that side as well.  Once the roof is on, I can get started on all the doors.

Front view

 Note the overhang for the roof. I want to give a nice depth to the looks and the keep as much water off the coop and the back door if I can.

Back side

run

The nest boxes:

Pretty simple here, but I did box the 2x4 wall studs and make the two partitions 2" thick. This keeps a nice clean profile and makes clean up easy.  Plus, the odd size next boxes bugged me the other way!
The nest boxes

Just a Tarpaper Shack:

Here we are a little while later, the roof is finished, the tarpaper is on the coop and it is time to start sealing it up!

Roof & tarpaper

Now with some doors and the addition of a gaurd dog, the coop is secure and even under lock and key!  I have a good coat of white wood stain which will be painted over in spots, but this soaks into the wood to preserve it better.

doors

Here is a good view of the front of the coop, the OSB that fill the arch around the door shall be shingled with cedar clapboards and painted to match the vinyl siding.  The coop itself will be vinyl sided in pale yellow when done. 

front view

 

 Air Movement:

Here is my main air venting that faces out to the run. This area will have two doors, hinged in the middle on the center brace to close off in the winter. I may make these windows when shut, I have not decided yet.  You can see how the door going so high into the roof line allows for the air to flow into the coop itself.

main vent

 Here  is the venting from the eves, I also have a ridge cap with a 1" gap at the peak of the roof. These lower vents may have hinged doors to close and regulate the airflow in the winter.  *More on this later!

 eve

 

main vent

 

Finished Photos:

Here are the finished photos of my coop.  There are a few tweeks here and there to be made, but hardly anything that can not wait.  The girls love thier new home and feel quite safe in it!

Note the outdoor pulley system to raise and lower the pop door, very nice!

Left side 

All that is left is a little bit of landscaping, some pale yellow added in to the background of the doors, and the key-stone trim added at the peak of the roof.  The rear door is kept locked with a keyed hasp at the bottom of the door.  The barrel bolt on top keeps it secure and tight.

The fenced panel under the coop is where the portable tractor will "dock" to let the girls in and out of the coop to range in the yard.  I might use that as a place to dock a smaller coop and add a fence panel to the entrance under the coop so new chicks can get used to the coop and the other girls.

Rear view

And one last photo of the run, the "toys" and the girls.  The PVC feeder is filled with oyster shell and I used parts from an automotive muffler clamp to bolt them to the base of the coop. (painted brackets of course) The roost is screwed to the top peak of the rafters and the cross bars, both of them, have a notch chisled into the upright pole to lock the corssbars like a log cabin.  The feeder hangs from some sturdy chain, while the waterer sits on a cut down 5-gallon bucket. The bottom half of the bucket fits the base perfect and it has never been knocked over.  I have a few bags of sand in the run now, but plan to add a few more as time goes on.  I find that it is so much eaiser to rake the run with the sand in it and so far I have not noticed any smells.  I plan to pick up a bag of lime to rake in every now and then to keep it this way!

run

Thanks for looking, Lee

 

Comments (6)

This is such a clean, great build. We will definitely incorporate some of these ideas as we build a new custom coop.
Wow, this is a great coop!
This has been my main inspiration while building my new coop. I've got it all framed out and plywood on most of the sides but I still can't figure out how to install the corrugated roofing/trim pieces. Would you mind sharing a few closeup pictures?
I love the "docking" area for the tractor, exactly what i was thinking about :)
Uh oh!  I can't see any pictures!!!  It sounds like it has some of the major things I'll want when we build a hen house.  I also want the "deep litter" method with removal boards at any openings.  I wish I could see it!
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