New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by KYTinpusher

I use a mix of equal parts sand, peat and wood ash. The girls LOVE it! You can use any sand really. Home Depot or Lowes carry play sand as well as bags of sand (probably concrete sand). Either will work fine. The hens will eat the dust bath mix, too, so just make sure nothing has any additives in it. Any landscape or garden center should have sand available also. The wood ash is really good for controlling mites, lice and fleas. If you don't have a fireplace or fire pit to...
I have read that the few random black feathers on blue birds are a result of a blue x black mating. Many breeders use black in their blue breeding program to darken the blue and perhaps improve tha lacing, but the errant black feathers can crop up. It is a fairly common occurance and while those birds are probably not show quality, they can be breeder quality. I believe putting your pullet with a blue cock should help clear it up, but he does not have to be a light blue.
Interesting!  I haven't seen any rumpless in my birds. I started with 2 pair from GFF and 2 pullets from Ewe Crazy. I think I am growing out a fourth generation now and no rumpless have cropped up, though woollies have. You NEED some woollies!   I have a woolly pullet from a friend growing out and am hoping to match her with one of my woolly cockerels in a couple of months. If all goes well, I should have eggs this winter sometime. However, I now know that my first...
 No problem, you are welcome to enjoy our chocolates with us! Here are a couple pictures that I just took outside. The color shows up better, but still doesn't really do them justice. Standard splash in the upper left and mauve splash on the right Dark blue on left and mauve on the right.
Yes, mauve is the result of having both blue and chocolate genes. It is lighter than a chocolate bird. The same gene that dilutes black to blue dilutes chocolate to mauve. I describe mauve as the color of hot chocolate. This is not the best representation of the color, but it does show the color difference as it should be. From left to right - mauve splash, mauve, standard splash, The color of the dark feathers on the mauve splash is actually the same as on the mauve,...
I have hatched Mauve and Mauve Splash pullets from this mating. I don't have pictures right now, but there is a definite difference. All of the cockerels were blue and blue splash - half should be split to chocolate, but of course that can only be confirmed by test breeding. Only this one with the one partially chocolate feather has me wondering what is up. I am beginning to wonder if it is a hermaphrodite? I guess I will have to see when/if it lays an egg.ETA - The other...
I see saddle feathers, so looks like you have a cockerel there.
These are coming up as I try to navigate to new pages on my PC running Win 7, Google Chrome. These are a couple of them:   Fatal error: Cannot redeclare class FormHelper in /var/www/sites/huddler/releases/e622fabf831b381875e1856a48b5fa1d93ba4a3f/v2/system/application/libraries/helpers/Form.php on line 14 Fatal error: Cannot redeclare class ObjectTypes in...
Yes, it is entirely possible. In fact many breeders who raise breeds for the show ring routinely keep the cocks and hens separate to keep them in show form. I would give one at least 6-8 sq.ft. A lot of breeders use the 55 gallon barrels on their side with a wire door on the lid. This is just one example: 
I have had an interesting juvenile pop up in my Chocolate/Mauve project. I have an 11 week old juvenile that I believe is a pullet, but I am not positive yet. She is the result of a Splash/split to chocolate cock over a blue hen. There is a slight chance that I marked the egg wrong (about 1/2 of 1%) as I am only human, and she could be out of a mauve hen under the same cock. However, that still does not explain her. She is a standard splash color with 1, and only 1, half...
New Posts  All Forums: