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Posts by Puddle Foot Farm

Hello all,Haven't been on for a while, as I've been in Canada for the summer. I got home two days ago, and the next day, out popped a gosling from under my goose! My mom and I were shocked, and separated out the mother, father, and gosling from the rest of the flock. The next day, the gosling was dead. We had no idea why, but it looked kinda like a snake had gotten it and then regurgitated it. Anyways, later on yesterday, two more hatched. We were again delighted! We...
Hello guys!We will be testing out selling our cotton patch goose eggs. As you may know, cotton patch geese are extremely rare heritage geese that originated in America's deep south to weed cotton patch fields. We have both the saddleback and solid varieties together, meaning you will probably get a mix of both. This is a limited time pricing, as these are our first eggs (fertility confirmed). We cannot sell goslings at this time, but would not like the eggs to go to waste....
Since you asked..The following one got stuck, but we helped him out of his shell and he lived. These are all toulouse and chinese crosses, from my first geese. We sold them as a flock to be an alarm system for a very large chicken farm. They also sell their eggs for eating, which we supply to them as well.
My ducks drop off because of physical temperature change, not the availability of water, I believe.. Is the temperature in the pens different?What I really want to ask is.. What do you do with 3500 duck eggs?
Yes, we do. We used a small sized maglite LED in a very dark room, as goose eggs have pretty thick shells and can be hard to see through. You should definitely be able to tell if they are growing or not, as you will see veins in the eggs. If you think you have a dud any time, mark it, and then make sure you check it carefully a few days later. If it still looks dead, then toss it. We candled every 2 or 3 days, starting on day 4.
I just put them somewhere safe at room temperature. Misting just helps simulate a wet goose going back to her nest, but I read it also helps with moisture loss? I don't know where I read this - somewhere on BYC I believe. You should also look up old threads on hatching geese. Some of the older ones are very informative!
I had an incubator with a tray, so I could take the tray of eggs out. I think I left them up to 30 minutes, then put them back in the warm incubator. If you took off the lid, I suppose you could decrease the time to around 10 minutes or so, so the incubator would slowly get back up to temp. Also, I forgot to say but you do not start misting until the 4th day. It doesn't matter what time you do it, but I usually did mine in the late afternoon. Our humidity was 55%ish for...
Geese naturally get off the nest for 10-30 minutes a day and to eat and take a quick bath. So, many goose hatchers replicate this by letting their eggs cool, and then misting them before putting them back in the incubator. I forgot how long I let mine sit out, but the time was variable every day. I left them out a bit too long sometimes (40 minutes or over), but it did not effect my hatching rates (I had 8 out of 11 hatch for my first hatch, which I think is awesome for...
I hand turned with mine, but that just entailed moving the entire incubator. In either instance, you have to spray and cool the eggs, so that might be a case either way. You may remember to do that better with hand turning, or since you have to do that, autoturning will save you time?What kind of incubator do you have?
I used a Brinsea Eco to hatch goose eggs for the first time - out of 11 at lockdown, 8 hatched. I had to open it a few times to take out goslings and shells to make room for the rest, but no one was adversely affected, IMHO. I will be using it this year for goose eggs, and am thinking about getting another.
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