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Posts by Peeps61

I'm glad it worked out!   Just make sure they have room to get away from the heat lamp, plenty of food and fresh water, and they should do just fine!  They are so tiny when they come from the hatchery.  Make sure you take pictures, because in a week, you won't believe how much they will have grown, and in a month, they will look like little velociraptors!
I've found chickens to be incredibly tough birds when it comes to the elements.  I am a bit overcautious with the chicks, but I'm outgrowing it! 
Hi Sally from Pace.  I live in Molino, so we share the same weather.  If you read my post in this thread, you'll see what has worked for me in the past.  I am putting my chicks out into the tractor today, with the heat lamp for those cold evenings, or sudden drops in temperature that we sometimes get.  They are pretty feathered out, but have the option to get under the lamp, or stay out if they wish.  It's worked very well for the last 3 years, so I think you'll be OK as...
If they have a heat lamp on really cold nights, they should be fine.  The one in your picture looks pretty feathered out, so I think you're good.
I live in NW Florida, and it's been in the 80's most days here, lower 70's at night.  Now, the cold weather is NOT finished yet, but I can put my chicks out into my chicken tractor, with a heat lamp, and they'll do just fine.  The run on the tractor is big enough that the chicks can either huddle under the heat lamp, if needed, or scatter to the food and water and other areas of the run to stay cool.  It's worked very well in the past, and I usually put the chicks out at a...
You will also notice that as the chicks approach laying age (16 weeks plus, depending on the breed) that they will get much friendlier.  Mine would literally pull at my shirt and crawl into my lap if I sat outside with them.
Three weeks is not too old.  Don't pick them up from above, as that triggers their predator evasion instinct.  Put your hand in the brooder away from the chicks and come in slowly from the side to scoop them up, and put them back the same way.  If your hand also has some treats in it, that helps as well.
My post office is wonderful.  When my chicks arrived, they called me to let me know they were there, and I went and got them.  In fact, my father, a retired postal worker, told me if they attempted to deliver and you weren't home to get them, you would be called to come and get them.  If not picked up that day, back to the hatchery the chicks would go.   Maybe different rules in different states?  I wouldn't think so, but you never know.  Plus, our PO is in a rural, farm...
Ha ha!!  You've got it BAD BluesLadies!   I have 25 grown outside, and 8 still in the indoor brooder.  3 coming next weekend and 10 more the following weekend (buff Orp. and EE).  So, I'll have limited myself to 21 new chicks for this season. :-)
Like others have mentioned, many factors make up the flock.  As far as human docile birds, everything I've ever had in hen form was friendly to humans and to me.  They view us as the providers of food.  My Easter Egger hens and Buff Orphingtons have been the best with kids.  However, my Easter Egger rooster was Satan incarnate, and my polish rooster and my white leghorn/polish cross roosters have been very human friendly - no attacks at all.  So keep in mind that what is...
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