New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Chris09

 Right In animals and plants when a particular outcome is achieved it is considered a hybrid. Example -- When Hunts was developing the 1439 Hybrid tomato they knew that they wanted a tomato that was determinate, firm, crack resistant fruit. Resistance: verticillium wilt, fusarium wilt. It turn they crossed the Heinz 1350 and the Campbell 135 (The Heinz 1350 is a  Eastern State 54-1878-3 x Experimental Hybrid) In poultry (chickens) We can take a Rhode Island Red Rooster and...
They look like they may be cross bred, maybe a Cochin/ Wyandotte cross.
Let make it easy,  Hy·brid hīˌbrid/ The offspring of two plants or animals of different species or varieties, such as a mule (a hybrid of a donkey and a horse). In biology a hybrid is an offspring of two animals or plants of different races, breeds, varieties, species, or genera.    It is a "fancy" word for cross bred.
If there laying a layer type feed if not then they should be on either a starter/ grower or a grower feed.Also you could feed them a starter/ grower even if there laying just offer oyster shells off to the side.
If your going to soak any mash, crumble, or pelleted feed you will want to feed back any of liquid also there is going to be a lot of nutrition left behind if you don't. 
Who is this question for?
The chickens look to be a pullet Gamefowl cross the Blue legs may have came from the Gamefowl, both Hatch and Kelso can come Blue legged.
When feeding breeding fowl you need to take inconsideration the nutritional need of both the hen and the rooster, if you feed them good you will have good healthy chicks. A regular Layer feed isn't going to cut it if your looking for a good hatch rate, healthy parent stock and healthy chicks. Breeders need a good feed with added proteins (18% or better) some added vitamin and should not contain the high amounts of calcium that a layer type feed has. (roosters can not expel...
Hay is more than just "dried grass leaves", hay consists of the leaves and the stems of either grass or a mix of grass and legumes.Hay is not totally dry and is cut 3 maybe 4 times a year with each cut being a little different in nutrition 2nd usually being the best.   Also remember most grasses that are used in hays don't pull back nutrients in the winter (much like most lawn grass doesn't) and that the leaves of tree and shrubs dry up much more that the leaves of grasses...
As long as the leaves are green they have Chlorophyll in them and thus have nutrition, when the leaves turn color, brittle/leathery the nutrition is gone. Theres a big difference between feeding dried leaves and feeding hay, one hay is a grass or a grass legume mix two not all the moister is out of the hay when bailed and fed, three chickens aren't grazers or browsers they don't process fibrous plants as well as Horse, Cattle, Goat or Sheep so any nutrition that is in the...
New Posts  All Forums: