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Posts by Mrs. K

oh - I noticed a big improvement starting at 1 year of age, and by 18 months quite a fine rooster.
well, I think you need to get rid of the mean roo, and the little roo, one rooster is enough for a flock that size. I would keep the head roo, as he is not bothering people. What you need is time. Mine went through the same thing, and I had 1 roo to 9 hens, I think it was a combination of molt, technique and enthusiasm on his part. When people talk here of a great roo, they talk about an older gentleman.  And the problem is getting them to be older!   Mine do get to...
I think a nice rooster is more the luck of the draw. There are many stories on here where a good pet went wrong! In fact, I have read that making a pet out of them, can make it worse, as they have no fear of you.   I did not handle my Easter Egger Roo. He and I are co roosters. He does not get close to me and so far is very polite to me. I have grandchildren that come occasionally. I do not let them near the roo. I like him very well, but I am not trusting that...
Yes, I am still involved in chickens, and I went to SDSU! But I am about as far away from you as I can get and still be in SD, I live on a ranch a little east and north of Buffalo Gap, SD.
or a combination - my hens looked terrible when my roo, came of age so to speak. But I think that he just magnifed the molt, feathers already falling out, fall out quicker with pulls on them. However, everything I read said older roos get better technique. And the only way to get an older one, is to wait.   Anyway, my roo got older, the girls got over the molt, and everyone looks beautiful now.   MrsK
The big issue is size, one should wait until they are very close to the same size, and that will take several months. It is so tempting to just hope they will get along, but most often if they are smaller it is not pretty.   The other thing is to have hide outs in the run, different levels in the run, like a pallet up on bricks or a roost outside so that they can get away from each other or out of sight.   MrsK
I would go down to one rooster, for your 11 hens. Roosters eat as much if not more, than hens, why would you want to keep a spare? In a home hobby, I do not really think there is a great advantage to a spare. If you were breeding to produce chicks for sale, then perhaps, but you would need considerably more than 11 hens. If you hatch out chicks, you will get roosters, so if the one you pick, does not work out, well you can pick again.   I have 9 hens with one roo,...
If you have a good hen, quit worrying about it. I was nervous at first, but the hen stayed between the flock and the chicks, and if one chick got to close to another hen, and she moved to peck it, the broody took her to task. As for the feed, just feed chick feed, and then offer oyster shell in another bowl. The chicks won't eat it, and the laying hens will.   Just give her a nest on the floor, she may use yours, or she may find a spot she likes better and make a...
I like your choice of 2 of each kind, cause it does make it easy to count them up at night when you are locking them up. I always have a mixed flock. I really think you could get by with one rooster. Which might cut your problems with the neighbors in half. Although if you have your heart set on it, two roosters, generally (not always) do better that are raised together. Some roosters will fight to the death, and it can be ugly. And lots of people just start out with...
I think that they may need some more space. You don't say how many and how much space. They are growing, and take up more than in the beginning. I do not get mine quite this early, because I want them outside as soon as possible, climbing over stuff, and having lots of space.   MrsK
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