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Posts by Gallo del Cielo

 You know, I haven't minded the occasional leaf while out in the yard.  I'll have to look and see if there is a difference in the taste of those in the ground compared to the ones still in pots.  It's really shocking how fast they grow.  I looked at mine one day and it was 11' and in just a couple days it was 13'.   Now it's 5'.     The only thing more amazing about their growth from seed is how they respond to pruning.  I pruned only a few days ago and all the new growth...
 Oh, that's good to hear.  You know, that's the thing, I love eating strange greens!  I've loved eating every one I've ever eaten.  Well, some of that late season escarole was about as bitter as anything I've ever eaten.  I'll try putting some in a bowl today to get a handle of how much they're actually eating and then some clipped the run wall.  Have you had yours overwinter yet?
 Yeah, bitter tastes are associated with alkaloid substances which are in turn sometimes troublesome.   I wonder if our alkaline soil has a contributing factor.  I did did a quick search and found that eating the roots is not recommended because of potentially dangerous alkaloids (I don't know for sure about the veracity of that).  I'm going to try drying them too.  I've been drying the celery leaves from the celery I grow.  Fresh, the leaves are practically inedible...
 I've had her deviled turkey eggs, they are divine!  
 I'm not having any problems growing them, they're growing amazingly well, better than anything else I've got growing right now.  It's the taste.  I'm wondering what others think about the taste and how they prepare them and do their chickens like them.   It has me wondering if this is normal, maybe my trees are just weird tasting from my soil or maybe my family and my chickens are just weird.  That last part is probably true anyway.     Yes, I have a grape cutting for you!
So, about these moringa trees.  Everything I read about moringa made me excited about growing them for us and the animals to eat.  What's not to like about them?  They're beautiful, super fast growers, roots, leaves and seeds are edible and the nutritional content is fantastic.  I had a hard time starting them over the winter (mistake) and by the spring I'd lost quite a few.  I tasted the tubers of some of those early failures and they were sublime.  Wonderfully smooth and...
 How wonderful!  This is what I'd hoped the seed box would do; what a great way to bring our members together.  I wish I could have been there too.
 Hello Ben, first of all,    Congratulations on your new homestead.  I don't have any direct experience with San Tan Valley Coops, but over the years a few BYC members from AZ have bought from them.  As I recall, all of them were pleased with their coops and customer service, which seems to be a rarity among coop companies.  I would highly recommend requesting hardware cloth instead of chicken wire and you can make that arrangement with the company when you order.  Some of...
That's it!
 You could probably get by planting them right now.  They'd do best if planted in the winter or early spring, but as long as you watered them regularly they should do well.  I think I planted mine at about this time of year, maybe a bit earlier.  If you were closer, I'd give you a vine I made from cuttings.
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