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Posts by ChicKat

So sorry to hear that you lost your hens.  There are a number of chicken diseases, and only a necropsy (As you say post mortem) can verify mareks.  When I had my pullet necropsy, they didn't find anything on the gross level, and had to go to the more expensive approach of growing cultures before they were certain it was Marek's.  Hopefully your flock is O.K. because some chickens are definitely resistant and do not get the disease - which was part of the point of this...
So sorry for your loss.  It is a big let down - when you have anticipated for 21 days.  I hope you can source some other good eggs and try again.....
Thanks, I for one appreciate the correction.   
This is a really good question, not sure you got your answer as of yet.  It is stated that they rarely go broody- but lots of us in the USA have a very different experience.  Someone out in CA had little pullets that would adopt younger chicks.  My first CL hen went broody and she hatched chicks.  A chick that is hatched by a broody is more likely to go broody than a chick hatched in an incubator.   So a daughter of my first CL hen did go broody - and she was fairly young...
in my experience, the first pullet eggs may be just slightly 'bluer' than the later ones -- possibly because the eggs increase in size as the pullet gets to maturity.  It definitely has never been like the Marans type of color fading that occurs during the egg cycle, because with Cream Legbars, the color ISN'T a coating like the brown-laying breeds, but a pigment that is incorporated into the entire shell and it is blue both inside and outside unlike brown egg...
Good luck with it--- I have candled and seen completely dark--- and later have had great chick hatch from that egg --- so just go ahead with it...sometimes you just never know. 
KP -That is what I am seeing too - the breast gets darker as the male gets older.  the hackles seem to get lighter.  Some youngsters that seem to have a chestnut here and there, I have seen that disappear in adult feathering and they seem to get lighter.   LOL - I was looking at my past 2-roo today and thinking on his crest, he is getting 'gray hair' - you know how some animals get a gray muzzle when they are old.   Still wondering in  my mind if there isn't a range of...
It is so interesting to hear people speak of darkening as the birds get older.  I think that one of the hens has lightened considerably here, and the rooster was more 'chestnut' in some places when he was REALLY little like 18-months ago.  What does darken on the rooster is the breast feathers.  As they mature, they do get the darker barring on the breast from the ones that I have seen...but I think that doesn't start until they are approaching 2-years old.  What's the...
Interesting information GaryDean26.  It makes me wonder if any hen that had Lukosis would have died before the 2nd Molt.    Grant Brereton is a poultry genetics expert and he advises waiting until the hen is 2-years old more for the true determination of what she will be, and for the fact that you are selecting for long-lived and productive into the later-years hen genetics, rather than a hen that dies at 1 1/2 years, and to avoid passing along some of the genetic...
Hi Kereone   Sending you a PM -- maybe between some of you you can get the Southern Hemisphere going!!  
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