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The Great Big Homemade Chicken Feed Recipe Sharing Thread - Page 7

post #61 of 69

It depends upon whether that is all they're getting. Keep in mind chickens are omnivores.

I'm struck by how so many people think that chickens are exclusively seed eaters and can survive, much less thrive on an all seed diet.

Perhaps it's because most people do offer scratch grains or because the 2 main ingredients in feeds are usually a grain and a legume.

 

While that blend is adequate in energy, most minerals, some vitamins and supplies a crude protein level of about 16 or 17% crude protein, there are still striking deficiencies.

Essential amino acids; minerals like manganese, iodine, iron, potassium and vitamins D, A , K come to mind.

 

Even though chickens of various ages have crude protein percentages recommended, chickens (and all animals) don't really have a specific requirement for crude protein percentage, but rather for the individual components that make up protein - amino acids.

Proteins are made up of several different combinations of amino acids. In digestion, proteins are broken down into individual amino acids that are absorbed into the bloodstream. The amino acids are then incorporated into new protein molecules. When formulating diets with commonly available grains and protein sources, the level of crude protein typically used to describe the diet usually will contain adequate amounts of amino acids.. However, it is important to remember that this is not always true when using synthetic amino acids and alternative or by-product feed ingredients, and that the dietary levels of amino acids should always be checked. It is becoming increasingly important to specify lysine and methionine levels when formulating poultry diets. That's why they are always listed in the guaranteed analysis on feed labels.

There are 13 amino acids essential to chickens while there are only 9 in humans. The limiting amino acid concept shows that If a diet is inadequate in any essential amino acid, protein synthesis cannot proceed beyond the rate at which that amino acid is available. 

There are some essential amino acids deficient in your mix. Notably, lysine, methionine and sometimes tryptophan are low in vegetative sources. Feed manufacturers add synthetic amino acids or an animal protein to make up for what is missing in their mix of seeds.

 

Your seed mix is also low in things like xanthophyll, carotenoids that contribute to a yellow pigment in yolk and skin.

 

If you want to avoid a complete chicken feed, you probably need to include some animal protein, green vegetation and fruits to fill in the nutritional gaps in your original mix.

 

http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G8352


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 9/28/15 at 9:33am

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #62 of 69


I've been using the corn-free Garden Betty recipe for about a year now, but am starting to wonder whether split peas and lentils violate the no-uncooked beans rule. Don't they?

post #63 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucysflock View Post
 


I've been using the corn-free Garden Betty recipe for about a year now, but am starting to wonder whether split peas and lentils violate the no-uncooked beans rule. Don't they?


Depends on if the peas/lentils have been processed some way before you got them... but if it has been working well for you for a year now, I think its fine.

 

Welcome to BYC and thank you for sharing!

post #64 of 69

Why would you feed chickens soybeans? They wouldn't eat them in the wild!

post #65 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mabell23 View Post
 

Why would you feed chickens soybeans? They wouldn't eat them in the wild!


True, that is why they are cooked or otherwise processed first.

 

Many of the recipes here are soy-free.

 

:welcome

post #66 of 69

Thank you, 

Next question why would someone want to feed them something that is ground up and smashed back into a pellet.

post #67 of 69

Just my opinion but probably because it is analyzed to be complete nutritionally and pelletizing wastes less and makes all those nutrients available in each bite.

Not doing so, chickens will pick and choose and may get too much of something and not enough of another.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #68 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mabell23 View Post
 

Thank you, 

Next question why would someone want to feed them something that is ground up and smashed back into a pellet.


It is because different ingredients have different shapes and weights. When buying a bag of mixed ingredients, you will have lighter, smaller foods in one place and denser foods in another place. So, what happens is parts of the feed have different nutritional qualities. This is how it would be in nature, except jungle fowl (ancestor of chickens, in the same way wolves are ancestors to dogs) can forage to find whatever nutrients they want. Chickens that do not free-range must eat what is in front of them.

 

Also, many of the ingredients in chicken pellets are unappealing to consumers, or they are powdery. "Smashing" it all into a pellet is done to keep everything together and hide bad ingredients.

 

This is the same reason commercial dog and cat food is ground into little shapes.

 

Thanks for all the good questions! Do you have chickens yet, and if so, what are you feeding them?

post #69 of 69

I am thinking about doing homemade feed for my chickens. What do you think about this?

25 lbs black oil sunflower seeds

20 lbs Alfalfa pellets

25lbs Whole Oats

25 lbs Cracked Corn

20 lbs Beat Pulp

10 lbs barely

If I did my math right protein is 17.44% They will also be getting free choice oyster shells. And free  ranging on 5 acres.

24 chickens and 4 ducks. Hens: speckled Sussex, 2 Red Sex-links, 3 White leghorns.2 silkies, 1 golden comet/Partridge silkie hen, 1 Red sex-link/Partridge silkie hen, 1 White leghorn/Speckled Sussex hen, Roosters: Red sex-link and Brown leghorn/Partridge silkie

3 Barred rocks 3 Red pullets

2 Easter Eggers

2 Millie flur d'uccle's

Ducks: 1 Mallard Drake, 1 Mallard Duck, 2 Khaki Campbell Ducks,

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24 chickens and 4 ducks. Hens: speckled Sussex, 2 Red Sex-links, 3 White leghorns.2 silkies, 1 golden comet/Partridge silkie hen, 1 Red sex-link/Partridge silkie hen, 1 White leghorn/Speckled Sussex hen, Roosters: Red sex-link and Brown leghorn/Partridge silkie

3 Barred rocks 3 Red pullets

2 Easter Eggers

2 Millie flur d'uccle's

Ducks: 1 Mallard Drake, 1 Mallard Duck, 2 Khaki Campbell Ducks,

Reply
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