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Do nice roosters always go bad? - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie Ruiz View Post

I had a barred rock rooster that I never really handled and it still came out a man fighter. He would run after me every chance he got he would even run at me from about a 1/4 acre away. I thought maybe it was just because of him showing the hens whos boss but when I sold off my hens that year I decided to keep the rooster to see if not having the hens anymore would change his aggression but nope. Still attacked every chance he could. Dealt with this for about 6 months... Until he got a .22 cal pellet to the back of the head smile.png I didn't even enjoy him, my dog did smile.png stupid rooster. I have 3 easter egger roosters right now that are about 15 weeks. They're nice and keep their distance as of now but we'll see what happens with them. Will not hesitate to put out an aggressive rooster anymore. Not dealing with it sorry

There is no reason to tolerate an aggressive bird. Some of them completely lose their brains once the hormones hit and never get it back. They get locked in that over-protective, everything is out to kill my flock, so I must kill it first mentality. It's not healthy for the rooster, the flock, or the people that have to take care of the birds. Just imagine the kind of stress a rooster like that is living with every moment of the day. The most humane thing to do is to put him down, one way or another.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post

There is no reason to tolerate an aggressive bird. Some of them completely lose their brains once the hormones hit and never get it back. They get locked in that over-protective, everything is out to kill my flock, so I must kill it first mentality. It's not healthy for the rooster, the flock, or the people that have to take care of the birds. Just imagine the kind of stress a rooster like that is living with every moment of the day. The most humane thing to do is to put him down, one way or another.
I agree. It was also very stressful when it would attack my family. It went after my mother a few times and would try and attack my baby nephew through the run. No no he had to go!!
Barred Rocks, Blue Laced Red Wyandottes, Buff Orpingtons, Black Australorps, Light Brahmas, and Columbian Wyandottes
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Barred Rocks, Blue Laced Red Wyandottes, Buff Orpingtons, Black Australorps, Light Brahmas, and Columbian Wyandottes
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post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sideWing View Post
 

Perfect response. Cute and cuddly. :gig

 

Starts with:

 

 

 

And when your not expecting it:

 

 

 

 

And then it ends in:

 

Just kidding. I will try to find a farm for him to live on. He is too small to eat. Unless I can find a good small rooster recipe. 

Even small roosters taste just like chicken.

If a raccoon can find enough to eat on a small chick, so can you.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyMonsters91 View Post
 

Hm.. you guys worry me. :P My Roo is gentle and nice, it's the reason I chose to keep him over my the other 4 more dominant and rough Roos when their gender became obvious. He's 18 weeks now and still gentle, even while he's ruling the girls. It's obvious he's the head of the flock. He's only now just trying to mate with the girls but hasn't quite gotten the hang of it. Not 'nice' in sense that he'll come up and want petting and try cuddling with me, but he'll follow me around if I'm moving around the run, and if I'm handling any of the girls he keeps close by. None of my chickens or ducks have ever tried to bite me. The worse I've got was a few small scratches a time or two on accident. He will run if I try to pick him up to put him back in the run space if he's out free-ranging. lmao. FX my guy stays respectful and gentle. :P

Roosters normally attack predators (which move quickly) and other roosters that are trying to mate with their hens.

Other roosters don't bring treats.

 

I move slowly around the flock and only handle the hens at night. I also bring treats. When walking among the birds I'm careful not to walk directly toward any of them. My birds aren't pets, they're livestock.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #14 of 18

We have to remember nature developed roosters to be flock protectors.  The ones that survived to breed the hens were tough, aggressive, and very diligent.  Because of evolution 98 % of today's roosters will become aggressive. 40 years ago that was not a problem because roosters were automatically sent to the cook long before they turned mean.  Aggressive roosters were tolerated for breeding purposes until the hobby breeder came along with the desire to have the backyard flock.  First rule to always remember is ROOSTERS AND CHILDREN DO NOT MIX.  If you want your children to experience the thrill of raising chickens stick with the hens.  Save the exceptionally nice tempered rooster for breeding.  Remember, even the most timid rooster will nail you if your back is turned, so always be vigilant when around them.  I keep my roosters separated from my hens as I'm not using them for breeding.  I taught them to get on the roost when I enter the coop.  If they don't, I make my position clear, and go on the attack until the rooster goes where they are supposed to be.  My cull roosters go to feed a large family down the road.

Married to the old dude. One horse: Thor. One mini horse: Panama Jack. 4 cockatiels:  Nutter Butter, Crystal, Kiki, Marco. 2 parakeets:  The Lemon Drop twins.  1 eccentric peacock:  George. 1 pet terrapin:  Mr. Tuttle. And 14 world famous Jersey Giants hens! Also 1 Black Copper Marans Rooster:  Lying Larry.  2 Black Copper Hens:  Moe, and Curly. Blue Copper Marans rooster:  Son of Steele....

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Married to the old dude. One horse: Thor. One mini horse: Panama Jack. 4 cockatiels:  Nutter Butter, Crystal, Kiki, Marco. 2 parakeets:  The Lemon Drop twins.  1 eccentric peacock:  George. 1 pet terrapin:  Mr. Tuttle. And 14 world famous Jersey Giants hens! Also 1 Black Copper Marans Rooster:  Lying Larry.  2 Black Copper Hens:  Moe, and Curly. Blue Copper Marans rooster:  Son of Steele....

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post #15 of 18
It's all in how they are trained. Next time hectries to peck you, grab him and hold him likeca football, peck HIM on the head with your finger, carry him around until he calmscdown and submits, then set him gently back down in front of the hens. 2 things, shows YOU are dominant, not him..and 2. Embarrassing him in front of his ladies will knock him down a level. Works for me; been through a few roos, never had one peck or go for me more than twice wink.png

Once they go untrained and mean, it can be very difficult, but not impossible, to give him "therapy" lol big_smile.png
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
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http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldchick View Post
 

We have to remember nature developed roosters to be flock protectors.  The ones that survived to breed the hens were tough, aggressive, and very diligent.  Because of evolution 98 % of today's roosters will become aggressive. 40 years ago that was not a problem because roosters were automatically sent to the cook long before they turned mean.  Aggressive roosters were tolerated for breeding purposes until the hobby breeder came along with the desire to have the backyard flock.  First rule to always remember is ROOSTERS AND CHILDREN DO NOT MIX.  If you want your children to experience the thrill of raising chickens stick with the hens.  Save the exceptionally nice tempered rooster for breeding.  Remember, even the most timid rooster will nail you if your back is turned, so always be vigilant when around them.  I keep my roosters separated from my hens as I'm not using them for breeding.  I taught them to get on the roost when I enter the coop.  If they don't, I make my position clear, and go on the attack until the rooster goes where they are supposed to be.  My cull roosters go to feed a large family down the road.

If I had a bit more land and not so many neighbors I would just make a grow out pen and use them for food. I have 6 cockerels I need to re-home or eat before they start crowing too much.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by shortgrass View Post

It's all in how they are trained. Next time hectries to peck you, grab him and hold him likeca football, peck HIM on the head with your finger, carry him around until he calmscdown and submits, then set him gently back down in front of the hens. 2 things, shows YOU are dominant, not him..and 2. Embarrassing him in front of his ladies will knock him down a level. Works for me; been through a few roos, never had one peck or go for me more than twice wink.png

Once they go untrained and mean, it can be very difficult, but not impossible, to give him "therapy" lol big_smile.png

I think I could rehabilitate a breeding roo that goes south, but I just won't take the time to rehabilitate a cull when I can have him dressed in less than 10 minutes and be done with it. 

16 Gold Sexlinks, 2 Ameraucana/Leghorn EEs, 13 EE's, 7 Silver Laced Wyandotte, 1 Gold Cuckoo Marans, 12 Bev Davis Black Copper Marans, 5 Lavender Wyandottes, yes Lavender Wyandotte. Also raise Cornish X meat birds.
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16 Gold Sexlinks, 2 Ameraucana/Leghorn EEs, 13 EE's, 7 Silver Laced Wyandotte, 1 Gold Cuckoo Marans, 12 Bev Davis Black Copper Marans, 5 Lavender Wyandottes, yes Lavender Wyandotte. Also raise Cornish X meat birds.
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post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sideWing View Post

If I had a bit more land and not so many neighbors I would just make a grow out pen and use them for food. I have 6 cockerels I need to re-home or eat before they start crowing too much.

I think I could rehabilitate a breeding roo that goes south, but I just won't take the time to rehabilitate a cull when I can have him dressed in less than 10 minutes and be done with it. 

Lol good point wink.png I wouldn't bother with a "gunny sack" type attack roo either unless he was drop dead GORGEOUS and I needed the DNA ha-ha big_smile.png
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #18 of 18

what kind of breed is he?:/

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