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Do I Let My Broody Hatch Babies Now? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MesMama View Post


Does it hurt the hens to continually break their broodiness? Like will they just stop going broody all together even in the spring?

As far as I know broodiness is a response to Melatonin.  A chickens' melatonin is controlled by its Pinon gland.   A very small pine cone shaped area of the brain that is excited by Sunlight.  That is the main reason that a hen will lay during the Winter if her pinon gland is stimulated by artificial Sunshine (UV light).  Both the hen and her rooster comes into their natural breeding season in the Spring when the daily hours of Sunlight and thus melatonin are reaching their highest.  This will become obvious in the Spring when Both the roosters' and the hens' head, face, and comb plumps up and becomes bright red in anticipation of laying or in the roosters' case, assembling and defending a harem.  At this time a hens' head will look like a very ripe and swollen strawberry.  So i doubt that a hen will experience any significant decrease in her desire to sit, because she isn't in control of her own actions.  Mother nature is.  However at this time her chicks will have a smorgasbord of tender young insects, hen bit, and chick weed coupled with mild temperatures enabling them to grow up strong and fast.   Also don't get suckered into believing that less is more when setting eggs under a hen.  A full setting (15 eggs) have fewer swings in temperature and you will likely pip and hatch a larger % of your eggs at this time of year if for no other reason than the fact that the eggs are stronger and have a better mix of nutrients in the egg, and healthier or stronger seman from the rooster.  

But as i tell everybody, those chickens belong to you so do with or to them as you see fit.


Edited by chickengeorgeto - 9/25/15 at 11:00am
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Excellent information!  Thank you :) I had no idea about any of that, so this is very helpful!  And I did think that having a couple eggs under each hen was desirable, just to make it easier but what you are saying makes sense!  I think next spring I will wait for them to go broody and then add eggs under them for better odds (this year I had 4 hens go broody, but each only had 2-4 eggs under them)

 

 

P.S. I like your siggy!  Hehe!! :highfive:

Joyous mama to 2 kiddos, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens!-11 BO's including an awesomely sweet and gentlemanly head roo named Red.  Also, 9 Wellies-5 pullets and 1 cockerel named Lars, 4 SS and 2 SLW pullets :D
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Joyous mama to 2 kiddos, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens!-11 BO's including an awesomely sweet and gentlemanly head roo named Red.  Also, 9 Wellies-5 pullets and 1 cockerel named Lars, 4 SS and 2 SLW pullets :D
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post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MesMama View Post
 

Excellent information!  Thank you :) I had no idea about any of that, so this is very helpful!  And I did think that having a couple eggs under each hen was desirable, just to make it easier but what you are saying makes sense!  I think next spring I will wait for them to go broody and then add eggs under them for better odds (this year I had 4 hens go broody, but each only had 2-4 eggs under them)

 

 

P.S. I like your siggy!  Hehe!! :highfive:

Your welcome.

 

Also remember that baby chickens are a jealous bunch of little hellions.   So all the jostling and peeping going on in a nest full of pipping eggs gets the chicks competitive juices flowing and spurs them to make a greater effort to pip, unzip, and hatch.

 

No chick wants to be Tail End Charlie by entering the world at the tail end of the pecking order.  Use the chickens' own nature to help you.  But by all means learn how to properly store or keep your hatching eggs so that you can realize the greatest number of live and healthy chicks from each clutch.

 

Mike Sketcher's [?] A GUIDE TO BETTER HATCHING gives a great way to insure that hen hatched eggs have sufficient humidity by setting your hatching eggs on an upside down (dirt side up) slab of [green] grass turf.  Has any of you ever discovered a stolen (secret) nest where the old hen didn't choose to make her nest on the ground?   I know that I have seen this too, but that is not the way to bet.  They much prefer bare Earth on which to incubate their family.  If this was not so then hens would carry beaks full of straw from one end of the barn yard to the other just to "straw up" their nests.  Straw filled nests full of fuzzy baby chicks looks good from our faulty human point of view, but a mere 1/2 hand full of hay is much better as is a bowl shaped turf lined depression to hold the eggs.  Eggs are "egged" shaped for only one reason and this reason is to keep the big end of the egg higher than the pointed end.  A bowl shaped nest helps with this.  Therefor cut your slab of turf a little wider and longer [larger] than the inside of the nest box.  At any rate a hen moves or re-shuffles her eggs 20 or more times per day so she could care less about what we humans think about hatching her eggs.

 

NEVER ADD eggs under a setting hen.  Always allow her to go broody then remove the nest or bait eggs she went broody on and discard them, then set the entire clutch of un-incubated eggs under your setting hen, all at one time.  You'll get better results.  

 

A word about the real CHICKEN MATH.  If you set a setting of eggs @ 12 noon on the first day of the month, then 21 days has not expired until 12 noon on the 22nt day of the month at which time 21 days will have elapsed.

 

Hens often pickup their eggs and hold them under their wings for reasons that only the hen understands.  So if you are itching to get a glimpse of and count your chickens before they hatch, wait for the hen to get off the nest on her own.  Never pick her up, no matter how gently or you may be met with a shower of eggs falling from under her wings.


Edited by chickengeorgeto - 9/25/15 at 11:08am
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post

Your welcome.

Also remember that baby chickens are a jealous bunch of little hellions.   So all the jostling and peeping going on in a nest full of pipping eggs gets the chicks competitive juices flowing and spurs them to make a greater effort to pip, unzip, and hatch.

No chick wants to be Tail End Charlie by entering the world at the tail end of the pecking order.  Use the chickens' own nature to help you.  But by all means learn how to properly store or keep your hatching eggs so that you can realize the greatest number of live and healthy chicks from each clutch.

Mike Sketcher's [?] A GUIDE TO BETTER HATCHING gives a great way to insure that hen hatched eggs have sufficient humidity by setting your hatching eggs on an upside down (dirt side up) slab of [green] grass turf.  Has any of you ever discovered a stolen (secret) nest where the old hen didn't choose to make her nest on the ground?   I know that I have seen this too, but that is not the way to bet.  They much prefer bare Earth on which to incubate their family.  If this was not so then hens would carry beaks full of straw from one end of the barn yard to the other just to "straw up" their nests.  Straw filled nests full of fuzzy baby chicks looks good from our faulty human point of view, but a mere 1/2 hand full of hay is much better as is a bowl shaped turf lined depression to hold the eggs.  Eggs are "egged" shaped for only one reason and this reason is to keep the big end of the egg higher than the pointed end.  A bowl shaped nest helps with this.  Therefor cut your slab of turf a little wider and longer [larger] than the inside of the nest box.  At any rate a hen moves or re-shuffles her eggs 20 or more times per day so she could care less about what we humans think about hatching her eggs.

NEVER ADD eggs under a setting hen.  Always allow her to go broody then remove the nest or bait eggs she went broody on and discard them, then set the entire clutch of un-incubated eggs under your setting hen, all at one time.  You'll get better results.  

A word about the real CHICKEN MATH.  If you set a setting of eggs @ 12 noon on the first day of the month, then 21 days has not expired until 12 noon on the 22nt day of the month at which time 21 days will have elapsed.

Hens often pickup their eggs and hold them under their wings for reasons that only the hen understands.  So if you are itching to get a glimpse of and count your chickens before they hatch, wait for the hen to get off the nest on her own.  Never pick her up, no matter how gently or you may be met with a shower of eggs falling from under her wings.
Fantastic info! 😄 Thanks again!!
Joyous mama to 2 kiddos, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens!-11 BO's including an awesomely sweet and gentlemanly head roo named Red.  Also, 9 Wellies-5 pullets and 1 cockerel named Lars, 4 SS and 2 SLW pullets :D
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Joyous mama to 2 kiddos, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens!-11 BO's including an awesomely sweet and gentlemanly head roo named Red.  Also, 9 Wellies-5 pullets and 1 cockerel named Lars, 4 SS and 2 SLW pullets :D
Reply
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
And BTW, she is broody AGAIN 😩 This hen. It's going to be a LONG time until spring lol!!
Joyous mama to 2 kiddos, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens!-11 BO's including an awesomely sweet and gentlemanly head roo named Red.  Also, 9 Wellies-5 pullets and 1 cockerel named Lars, 4 SS and 2 SLW pullets :D
Reply
Joyous mama to 2 kiddos, 2 dogs, and 2 chickens!-11 BO's including an awesomely sweet and gentlemanly head roo named Red.  Also, 9 Wellies-5 pullets and 1 cockerel named Lars, 4 SS and 2 SLW pullets :D
Reply
post #16 of 16

I have some hens raising their third brood right now and some on eggs. I have one of this years spring pullets 6 months old that just hatched her first brood. Give them a dry place and block the wind and they will be fine. Provided the hen has retained the instincts needed to be a good mother. The hardest thing is keeping fresh water thawed out and available.

NPIP Certified Oriental Games and Asil
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NPIP Certified Oriental Games and Asil
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