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Egg Temperature

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I collect eggs daily and like to keep them room temperature. My daughter's babysitter put the eggs in the fridge and I just now realized it, it's been about 4 days. We're about to go on a 14 hour road trip to visit family and I wanted to take the eggs. Can they go back to room temperature? They haven't been washed so they didn't need to be in the fridge.
post #2 of 7

I would not let them get back to room temp, especially if they haven't been washed.

I never refrigerate unwashed eggs, if they need washing they go in the fridge get used first.

 

Better get a cooler.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

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Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #3 of 7
Unfortunately, coming back to room temp will cause condensation, which will wash the bloom off the egg. So, once refrigerated, they really need to stay that way until they are used. Bummer that they ended up in the fridge! I agree. A cooler is in order.
Edited by eleaserek - 9/18/15 at 7:25pm
post #4 of 7

I have a similar situation. The eggs that needed cleaning were cleaned by rubbing with an abrasive cloth. They were kept unrefrigerated for a couple of weeks, and then refrigerated.

My question is, can they now be taken out of refrigeration and kept out for up to 12 hours? I sometimes sell surplus eggs to co-workers, but in doing so, they will need to be out of the refrigerator for up to 12 hours, maybe less.

If condensation is the issue, can they be wrapped in an absorbent towel during this "warm-up" time so that any condensation will be soaked up by the towel?

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by RebelYell View Post
 

I have a similar situation. The eggs that needed cleaning were cleaned by rubbing with an abrasive cloth. They were kept unrefrigerated for a couple of weeks, and then refrigerated.

My question is, can they now be taken out of refrigeration and kept out for up to 12 hours? I sometimes sell surplus eggs to co-workers, but in doing so, they will need to be out of the refrigerator for up to 12 hours, maybe less.

If condensation is the issue, can they be wrapped in an absorbent towel during this "warm-up" time so that any condensation will be soaked up by the towel?

IMO, if you're going to clean an egg, clean the whole thing ....thoroughly.....dry it as soon as possible and then keep it refrigerated. 

Spot cleaning removes the bloom in one spot, and may actually grind any 'dirt' into the pores in that spot, leaving an opening for the bacteria on the rest of the egg to migrate thru shell.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Ok. Go it. But my question is actually if I take them out of the refrigerator can they be left out at room temperature.and if the problem with doing that is that the eggs surface will condensate water and then that water is now the vehicle to take the bad stuff from the outside of the egg to the inside of the egg can I mitigate that risk by wrapping the egg in an absorbent towel when taking them out of the refrigerator.I am thinking that if I absorb the water as it condensates then even though there is no longer any Bloom on the surface of the egg to protect it the water is the vehicle and that water will be absorbed by the towel instead of leaking through the eggs shell into the interior. Does this sound plausible?
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by RebelYell View Post

Ok. Go it. But my question is actually if I take them out of the refrigerator can they be left out at room temperature.and if the problem with doing that is that the eggs surface will condensate water and then that water is now the vehicle to take the bad stuff from the outside of the egg to the inside of the egg can I mitigate that risk by wrapping the egg in an absorbent towel when taking them out of the refrigerator.I am thinking that if I absorb the water as it condensates then even though there is no longer any Bloom on the surface of the egg to protect it the water is the vehicle and that water will be absorbed by the towel instead of leaking through the eggs shell into the interior. Does this sound plausible?

Put them in a cooler?

Or a tight plastic bag, then the condensation will form on the bag instead of the egg.....maybe...

.....used to do that with camera equipment that was used out in the cold, but that's really not the same thing.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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