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Attaching hardware cloth to bottom of coop frame: to crease or not to crease. - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
What a wonderful thing to wake up to. Awesome responses to my question. I think I'll do uncreased today but leave room for creased if a change my mind later on done the road.

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

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"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Egghead_Jr View Post

It looks better creased. If secured to your bottom board nothing will get in there. Where they will get in is digging under your run. To prevent this use a decent welded wire like 14 gauge 2x4" fencing. I take the 4ft fencing and cut in half to have about 2ft running flat out from run walls. You can lay flat on ground and allow grass to grow through it or pull up sod and lay under it. Animals when digging will always dig at the fence line. Hit wire and move over to dig at fence line again. They don't back up so something as big as neighbors dog digging will not reveal the beck edge of 2ft of wire.

Thanks Egghead! I have left over hardware cloth and some fencing wire that I can use for a skirt.

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

Those look like ¾” poultry staples. They work pretty well to tack the wire in place but I would not trust them over time. With wood expanding and shrinking they can eventually work loose. A strong raccoon or big dog might be able to pull them out. That’s a neat job, by the way.

I personally prefer the uncreased. I’m an engineer and am going to go technical on you. Sorry in advance. When something pulls or presses against the wire the creased is going put a tensile force on the staple, it will try to pull it out. With the uncreased it will put a shear force on the staple. That means it pulls from the side not from above. You’ll get a stronger connection with the uncreased.

To make that a whole lot stronger, make it prettier, and to cover the sharp ends, I suggest you cut strips of wood maybe ½” to a better ¾” thick to cover those ends. (Called furring strips) Drill pilot holes to keep the wood from splitting and screw those over the ends of the wire. Make sure those screws go through the holes in the hardware cloth. Clamp that down pretty tight and that wire is not going anywhere, creased or uncreased. If you use thinner wood that is really dry it can sometimes split but if you put a fender washer on the screw it will spread the pressure and really stop the splitting.

You did not leave yourself a lot of room for this with the uncreased but looking at your workmanship I think you can manage to get the screws through the holes in the hardware cloth.

Good luck!

Ridgerunner, you almost have me blushing with your comments on my project! (Workmanship and neat job, X} I'll take it!)

I love the technical explanation. Can't wait to talk about it when I show off my coop. I will of course give credit to BYC, Ridgerunner, and all the other awesome folks posting here.

Heh, I think I have at least two other threads I started to ask technical questions for building this baby. People find it interesting enough that you keep chickens but explaining that there are hundreds of other people just a BYC post away is an added fun fact!

Also the furring strip is a great idea. Very secure and doesn't rely on staples or nails to hold steady through the heat and wet. I will look into it.... After I build them a roost, nesting boxes, waterer & feeder houses..... It's amazing how early I started this project and I'm still down to the wire. Oh, hahaha I'm all over the wire actually. I go in to work with all sorts of fun little scratches. I'm in FL and haven't moved to a long sleeved shirt for projects of these types. I guess I don't mind looking down and being reminded of my coop all day. smile.png

Thank you thank you!

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Either way looks fine...but what kind of staples are those?

Thanks aart. They are 1/2 staples: Arrow Fastener T50 1/2 in. Leg x 3/8 in. Crown Galvanized Steel Staples (1,250-Pack)

They are GENUINE & HEAVY DUTY (since my inflection doesn't travel across the net, I like to say those words with a heavy drawl. All the good buzz words and qualifiers you're looking for on your 30th trip (for this project) to a hardware store. The back of the package said good for wire mesh, weather-stripping, roofing felt, etc.

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowchipss View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Either way looks fine...but what kind of staples are those?

Thanks aart. They are 1/2 staples: Arrow Fastener T50 1/2 in. Leg x 3/8 in. Crown Galvanized Steel Staples (1,250-Pack)

They are GENUINE & HEAVY DUTY (since my inflection doesn't travel across the net, I like to say those words with a heavy drawl. All the good buzz words and qualifiers you're looking for on your 30th trip (for this project) to a hardware store. The back of the package said good for wire mesh, weather-stripping, roofing felt, etc.

T50 won't cut it long term...better look into the furring/trim strips and screws.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

T50 won't cut it long term...better look into the furring/trim strips and screws.

Thanks! I will have that on my list of things to do. Appreciate the advice. 8) For now, I do an inspection around the coop when I go out first thing in the morning and when I get home from work.

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply

"A cowchip is paradise for a fly"- Savvy Sayin's - True Wisdom from the Real West by Ken Alstad

 

In the incubation stages of planning my next flock. ~:>

Reply
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