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If I didn't see it for myself I wouldn't believe it - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

The other, it had to have been a first since there's been no evidence at all to suggest any. I just don't know who did it though cochin, buff, or sex link. I can't really go by that whole "if you touch them and they squat" thing because they've always done that. They lay down automatically when I pet them and have since they were peeps.

post #12 of 15

I find the pelvic points to be most accurate, but takes some practice.

Probably just beginners glitch, try to be patient. 

 

Signs of onset of lay---I've found the pelvic points to be the most accurate.

Squatting:

If you touch their back they will hunker down on the ground, then shake their tail feathers when they get back up.

This shows they are sexually mature and egg laying is close at hand.

 

Combs and Wattles:

Plump, shiny red - usually means laying.

Shriveled, dryish looking and pale - usually means not laying.

Tho I have found that the combs and wattles can look full and red one minute then pale back out the next due to exertion or excitement, can drive ya nuts when waiting for a pullet to lay!

 

2 bony points(pelvic bones) on either side of vent:

Less than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means not laying.

More than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means laying.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

I might have to check pelvic points because their combs and wattles don't have a pink look to them anymore and there's never a point during the day that I've seen where they do. All of my bigs have nicely red combs and wattles. My littles are still flat and pink (they're EE) and just now 4mos, so I know they're not ready yet. I've been really patient, while I admit it's exciting, I've been patient. Even with the egg songs they've been singing I don't run out every time to check. At first I checked more often, but I've found a pattern in their laying. :) One laid one this afternoon and I knew by how long they sang it was probable she did, but waited until normal checks/treat time before looking. I hate the thought of accidentally scaring one out of the box (I did that once when I didn't know Ghost, my first one to lay, was trying to).

post #14 of 15

I checked a lot too with my first crew, not quite as much with subsequent pullets.

It's a balance between spooking them and getting them used to you being in the coop, eventually they don't mind my presence at all.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

I head out there for feeds, waters, treats, and just some relaxation. I interact with them, but I do a lot more observing now than anything unless I see a need to handle. I did pet a few today, hold one this morning and carry her around for being a little bully, and have to make the rooster back down when I went in with my son's HS worker to collect eggs (he went to come into the coop to see what I was doing and got spooked that someone new was in there so he reacted in a negative way). Other than needed things I tend to stay out of the coop and in the exercise yard. When they were little peeps I was a lot more hands on. Now I have learned that they need and appreciate their space from me, and when they want something they will come to me. :) My rooster loves to come over and see what I have when I come in, then once he does he just goes about his business lol

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