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Hole in the ground and two dead chickens

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

 

This summer I have lost 2 birds.  1 an adult silkie rooster and the other a 7 week old white sultan.  Both in different coops and both were found on top of a hole in the ground that was not there 12 hours earlier.  The hole is barely large enough for a ground squirrel and the interior of the hole appears to be a bit wet.  There were no visible wounds on either bird, just dead.  The sultan was still barely alive when I found it this morning and appeared to be almost drugged.  Coming in and out of awareness.  It died moments later.  There were feathers as if there had been a struggle in both cases. I am located in central Indiana, just north of Indianapolis. I would really like to know what is causing this and how to stop it. Any suggestions are welcome!  These holes are inside of a coop with both wood and wire going down into the ground several inches.

 

post #2 of 7

Was birds head wet?

Thinking snake.

 

No blood anywhere, no wounds on neck under feathers?

 

I'd stick a hose in that hole and turn it on full blast, find the other end of tunnel.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Plan on doing that today.  There were some feathers here and there, but no blood at all. The head was not wet, but the chick was still alive and could barely keep consciousness.

post #4 of 7
Do you have poisonous snakes there? How about weasels?
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

We have figured out that it is Norway rats!  So all the chickens have been cooped up for the weekend with several traps set and tomcat poison boxes out.  Hopefully we can get a handle on this before I lose anymore chickens.  I found a silkie egg that had been rolled out of the nesting box, down the ramp and was pushed into the dirt half way under the coop wall. So, it has to be rats!

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharingchickens View Post
 

We have figured out that it is Norway rats!  So all the chickens have been cooped up for the weekend with several traps set and tomcat poison boxes out.  Hopefully we can get a handle on this before I lose anymore chickens.  I found a silkie egg that had been rolled out of the nesting box, down the ramp and was pushed into the dirt half way under the coop wall. So, it has to be rats!

Well, IDing is often half the battle....they can be tenacious, best of luck to ya.

 

Where are you located?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Well, IDing is often half the battle....they can be tenacious, best of luck to ya.

Where are you located?
Central Indiana
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