BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance › Wanting to build an awning similar to a hoop coop using cattle panels. Anyone who has worked with cattle panels please advise.
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Wanting to build an awning similar to a hoop coop using cattle panels. Anyone who has worked with cattle panels please advise. - Page 3

post #21 of 25
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Originally Posted by Blooie View Post
 

Ken and I not only looked into it, but we joined the straw bale forum many years ago.  We also took classes in alternative building at the local college.  Ours is designed and we just know that for us it's absolutely perfect.  But life got in the way of the building, as it does with so many other things.  We haven't given up on the dream - just postponed it.


SB homes are in use all over the country.  There are things that can be easily done to make them successful no matter where they are located.  There are many of them in Washington State and Oregon, and if any places in the country know rain and moisture issues those would be the ones.  Early settlers in the Sand Hill area of Nebraska used hay bales to build their homes and remarkably some of the them are still standing, despite missing roofs, clay slurry for surfacing, tornadoes, heavy snows, and being totally load bearing structures rather than the way most folks do them today.  Modern straw bale houses are usually built with a frame and straw bale infill but many old school builders still prefer to build load bearing buildings.  A straw bale grocery store in Glenrock, Wy, built in the 40s, is still open.  There are a few homes in Cody, one in Greybull, and one in Powell, all within 50 miles of us here. And those are just the ones I know about and have seen and personally toured.  

 

Okay, looks l like I hijacked another thread.  <sigh>  So let me pull myself back on topic by telling the OP that I think the cattle panel "awning" will work very well, and once the cattle panels are transported to the building site the hardest part is done!  

No need to worry about hijacking, lol. I love watching where a thread will go when diverse people contribute.  BTW, straw bale houses look so cool!

post #22 of 25

Thanks for the information Blooie. 

 

We got on the cattle panel wagon years ago when our Australian Cattle dog proved to us that he could escape any fence we put in front of him by chewing his way through....except for cattle panels. They weren't too much of a problem for him either. He just climbed over those.   We are almost glad he's a little older now and looks upon the challenge as costing too much energy.

Living La Vida Loca!
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Living La Vida Loca!
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post #23 of 25

The articles ive seen, say that the "rod" going thru them is a garden stake.  The garden stakes in our stores weren't long enough to do that with for the sides of a building, though. 

 

Since I'm using the cattle panel for support, I will use hay string run thru the bottles and tied off where the "run" is ending.  Will then attach the bottles to the panels every so often I think.  There have been some pics of some pretty awesome buildings done w/ plastic bottles.

Larry & Paula Hoffman

LP Painted Ponys

Cameron, NC

 

Barnyard chix - 2 PRs, 2 EEs,  1 cuckoo Marans, 2 buff Wyandottes, 5 Bantams, 1 OE,  2 Blue Ameraucanas; 1  roo, 1 blue Ameraucana roo. 12 BrahmaX pullets in a pasture tractor & 9 BrahmaX cockerels, 3 barnyard roos for freezer camp

Painted Shetland ponies doing farm work on 21 acres of land.  Some gardening.  Self sufficient?

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Larry & Paula Hoffman

LP Painted Ponys

Cameron, NC

 

Barnyard chix - 2 PRs, 2 EEs,  1 cuckoo Marans, 2 buff Wyandottes, 5 Bantams, 1 OE,  2 Blue Ameraucanas; 1  roo, 1 blue Ameraucana roo. 12 BrahmaX pullets in a pasture tractor & 9 BrahmaX cockerels, 3 barnyard roos for freezer camp

Painted Shetland ponies doing farm work on 21 acres of land.  Some gardening.  Self sufficient?

Reply
post #24 of 25

Don't understand the functional point of the bottle walls...they are not air tight so wouldn't hold warm air like greenhouse?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #25 of 25

Some that I have seen are pretty airtight.  Others use what isn't completely airtight and utilize that as their ventilation system rather than Doing additional ventilation systems.

 

I'm playing with keeping the bottle lines close/tight enough to make them shed water.  It may not work, we'll see.

Larry & Paula Hoffman

LP Painted Ponys

Cameron, NC

 

Barnyard chix - 2 PRs, 2 EEs,  1 cuckoo Marans, 2 buff Wyandottes, 5 Bantams, 1 OE,  2 Blue Ameraucanas; 1  roo, 1 blue Ameraucana roo. 12 BrahmaX pullets in a pasture tractor & 9 BrahmaX cockerels, 3 barnyard roos for freezer camp

Painted Shetland ponies doing farm work on 21 acres of land.  Some gardening.  Self sufficient?

Reply

Larry & Paula Hoffman

LP Painted Ponys

Cameron, NC

 

Barnyard chix - 2 PRs, 2 EEs,  1 cuckoo Marans, 2 buff Wyandottes, 5 Bantams, 1 OE,  2 Blue Ameraucanas; 1  roo, 1 blue Ameraucana roo. 12 BrahmaX pullets in a pasture tractor & 9 BrahmaX cockerels, 3 barnyard roos for freezer camp

Painted Shetland ponies doing farm work on 21 acres of land.  Some gardening.  Self sufficient?

Reply
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BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance › Wanting to build an awning similar to a hoop coop using cattle panels. Anyone who has worked with cattle panels please advise.