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Chickens keep getting cocci

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

My serama pullet (5 months old) died yesterday morning from what I think was cocci. She showed no signs the day before and we found her rolled over in the coop the next morning. We brought her inside and gave her some corid but she died 20 minutes later.

 

Just last month my silkie pullet got cocci, and the month before that my serama cockerel had it too. Luckily, we caught it early and they survived. This is our first death. Why do my birds keep getting it? I don't want to lose any more.

 

Thanks!

Serama Lama Ding Dong.

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Serama Lama Ding Dong.

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post #2 of 5

I doubt the one that died had coccidiosis. It doesn't cause sudden death.

It is very rare for new bouts of the disease once they've been exposed unless they keep moving to new areas where new strains will be encountered.

Once exposed and survive, they are resistant.

Your best bet is to get a necropsy. Otherwise it is a guess.

Here's your state lab.

Animal Health Diagnostic Center

240 Farrier Road

College of Vet Med, Cornell University

Ithaca, New York 14853

Phone: 607-253-4271 Fax: 607-253-3943

AI, CSF, CWD*, ND, FMD, SCRAPIE, IAV-S*

 

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03079459708419208

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenCanoe View Post
 

I doubt the one that died had coccidiosis. It doesn't cause sudden death.

It is very rare for new bouts of the disease once they've been exposed unless they keep moving to new areas where new strains will be encountered.

Once exposed and survive, they are resistant.

Your best bet is to get a necropsy. Otherwise it is a guess.

Here's your state lab.

Animal Health Diagnostic Center

240 Farrier Road

College of Vet Med, Cornell University

Ithaca, New York 14853

Phone: 607-253-4271 Fax: 607-253-3943

AI, CSF, CWD*, ND, FMD, SCRAPIE, IAV-S*

 

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03079459708419208


x2. Even small chicks have symptoms and can recover with treatment. Unless your birds have been moved a lot, they should have immunity to their environment. Something else is going on.

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
That's very odd. All the other birds seem fine as of now but I couldn't bear to lose another one. It'll be difficult to get a necropsy done since we already buried the bird. 

 

Any guesses?

 

I also wanted to add that she was breathing through her mouth before she died. Is Sudden Death Syndrome possible? I hear that's common in Seramas.


Edited by SJchickens - 9/25/15 at 10:47am

Serama Lama Ding Dong.

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Serama Lama Ding Dong.

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post #5 of 5

It could be lots of things.

Sudden death in mature birds can be from the following listed from the most common to least common.

Marek's, gout, colibacillosis, campylobacteriosis, ascites, lymphoid leucosis,

Fatty liver syndrome, streptococcosis, botulism, cholera, choking, pesticide poison.

Anaphylactic shock, listeriosis, erysipelas, malaria, bluecomb, aflatoxicosis, necrotic dermatitis.

Newcastle, influenza.

 

Don't overlook poisoning, bad food or gout.

 

Sudden death syndrome can be in broilers from 1-12 weeks of age. Extended neck, squawking, wing beating flipping onto back.

In laying hens, cloacal tissue protrudes through the vent.


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 9/25/15 at 11:01am

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
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