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Bleeding Silver Polish

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I have 9 White Rocks and 1 Silver Polish. They are all just about 13weeks and in the past week we have notice the Silver Polish had gotten pecked badly on her tail feathers to the point of bleeding. I had her separated in the house for 4 days to heal and put her back with the flock last night while the others were sleeping. I went out this morning to check on her and she was bleeding again!!! It seems like one of the other hens have been pulling at her feathers breaking them to the point of drawing blood. Being the over protective chicken mom that I am I immediately brought her back in the house cleaned her up. I want her to be able to go back with the flock I just don't know what to do or how to go about doing it. Anything will help at this point I just really don't want to have to find her a new home!
post #2 of 5
I'm afraid it's not wise to keep polish, especially a single polish with white rocks, they will kill your polish, crested breeds can be tricky to keep in a mixed flock, I don't think you are going to be able to keep her with them unfortunately.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by MandaJane814 View Post

I have 9 White Rocks and 1 Silver Polish. They are all just about 13weeks and in the past week we have notice the Silver Polish had gotten pecked badly on her tail feathers to the point of bleeding. I had her separated in the house for 4 days to heal and put her back with the flock last night while the others were sleeping. I went out this morning to check on her and she was bleeding again!!! It seems like one of the other hens have been pulling at her feathers breaking them to the point of drawing blood. Being the over protective chicken mom that I am I immediately brought her back in the house cleaned her up. I want her to be able to go back with the flock I just don't know what to do or how to go about doing it. Anything will help at this point I just really don't want to have to find her a new home!

Welcome to BYC!

 

Polish can be picked on because they often can't see very well due to their top knot...but it's not impossible to have them with other birds.

 

Did you raise these birds all together from chicks?

 

Is the bleeding from a broken pin feather or a wound to the skin?

At 13 weeks they are probably growing new feathers, chickens grow about 3 new set of feathers by about 6 months old. Pin feathers are full of blood and when broken can bleed profusely, like cutting the quick when trimming dogs nails, and may need to be plucked to stop the bleeding.

 

Separating bird for 4 days then putting it back into the flock is an integration issue, they don't remember her and will attack her like a strange intruder. It's best to segregate injured birds in a wire dog crate kept right in the coop/run so they stay within sight of the flock.

 

To add her back in I would follow some kind of integration plan, you'll have to do some chicken juggling because integrating a single bird is the most difficult integration. Maybe put her in a separate but adjacent pen for a few days to a week, feeding some treats a couple times a day right at the wire mesh separation wall so they learn to eat near one another. Then maybe put one of the existing flock in with the polish, see how it goes. Moving birds back and forth between pens, adding one or two at a time until you have two groups that can be fully integrated.

Just some ideas to ponder.

 

 

 

Here's some notes I've taken on integration that I found to be very helpful.......

......take what applies or might help and ignore the rest.

See if any of them, or the links provided at the bottom, might offer some tips that will assist you in your situation:

 

Integration of new chickens into flock.

 

Consider medical quarantine:

BYC Medical Quarantine Article

Poultry Biosecurity

BYC 'medical quarantine' search

 

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact. Integrating new birds of equal size works best.

 

For smaller chicks I used a large wire dog crate right in the coop for the smallers. I removed the crate door and put up a piece of wire fencing over the opening and bent up one corner just enough for the smallers to fit thru but the biggers could not. Feed and water inside the crate for the smallers. Make sure the smallers know how to get in and out of the crate opening before exposing them to the olders. this worked out great for me, by the time the crate was too small for the them to roost in there(about 3 weeks), they had pretty much integrated themselves to the olders.

 

If you have too many smallers to fit in a crate you can partition off part of the coop with a wire wall and make the same openings for smallers escape.

 

 

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

 

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

 

Places for the new birds to hide out of line of sight and/or up and away from any bully birds.

 

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best of mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

 

Another option, if possible, is to put all birds in a new coop and run, this takes the territoriality issues away.

 

Read up on integration.....  BYC advanced search>titles only>integration

This is good place to start reading:

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/adding-to-your-flock

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
It was a broken pin feather. We now have her in the pen with the rest of the flock but fenced off from the others. She seems to be healing really well and there has been no agrees soon from the other birds. The feathers are already growing back and we have found a new home for the rooster who we think may have started the pecking. Hopefully she can be back with the others soon. Also to answer your question she has been raised with the other birds since day 1. We got 16 of them at 3 days old and they have all always been together.
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by MandaJane814 View Post

It was a broken pin feather. We now have her in the pen with the rest of the flock but fenced off from the others. She seems to be healing really well and there has been no agrees soon from the other birds. The feathers are already growing back and we have found a new home for the rooster who we think may have started the pecking. Hopefully she can be back with the others soon. Also to answer your question she has been raised with the other birds since day 1. We got 16 of them at 3 days old and they have all always been together.

So it's not integration aggression because they've always lived together....but blood can make them aggressive.

Hopefully she can rejoin the others soon without too much 'chicken juggling'...Best of cLuck to yas!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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