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Washing eggs?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
This is my first time owning chickens and they just began to lay. I have read that you shouldn't wash the eggs but they have dirt and poop on them hmm.png is it ok to rinse them in warm water if i plan to refrigerate them and how long will they last?
post #2 of 6
When a hen lays an egg, the last thing she puts on them is a wet layer we call bloom. It quickly dries and forms a barrier that helps prevent bacteria from entering the egg. It’s not perfect but it’s pretty good. A clean egg with the bloom intact can usually set on your kitchen counter for a long time without bacteria getting inside, which is what causes it to go bad.

For bacteria to multiply the egg needs to be a minimum temperature. The warmer it is the faster the bacteria multiply. An incubated egg is the perfect temperature for bacteria growth but hens can hide a nest and lay eggs for over two weeks, then sit in them for three weeks with bacteria hardly ever getting inside. Ducks and turkeys go longer. That bloom is pretty good.

If the bloom is not intact, bacteria can enter the egg. If the egg is dirty with poop or dirt, the bloom may not be intact, though minor dirt isn’t that big of a risk. If you wash the egg (warm water as you mentioned is good) or if you scrape or scratch the dirt off, the bloom will probably not be intact.

In a refrigerator the temperature is well below a good temperature for the bacteria to multiply. Washed eggs will last a long time in the refrigerator before going bad. I can’t give you a specific time they will remain good since conditions vary, but you are generally talking weeks or even months, certainly not days.

 I grow a little impatient when people seem to think that they are unique in the world. Of course they are. Just like everyone else.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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 I grow a little impatient when people seem to think that they are unique in the world. Of course they are. Just like everyone else.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
So it is ok to rinse off the eggs before refrigerating? Or should i just wash them right before use? I collected 2 yesterday and put them in the fridge but did not wash them off
post #4 of 6
I always wash them. I don't want dirty egg sin the fridge.

 I grow a little impatient when people seem to think that they are unique in the world. Of course they are. Just like everyone else.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

 I grow a little impatient when people seem to think that they are unique in the world. Of course they are. Just like everyone else.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
post #5 of 6
Eggs we collect are kept on the counter, any that happen to be dirty are washed and put in the fridge.
2 Buff Orpingtons, 4 Black Sex Links,. 1 Golden Retriever, 1 "old man" cat and 2 Betta.
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2 Buff Orpingtons, 4 Black Sex Links,. 1 Golden Retriever, 1 "old man" cat and 2 Betta.
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post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
My welsummer is a natural. She just started to lay and has used the nesting box both times. Not sure who i laying the other eggs but i found 3 under the nesting boxes and 1 outside in a hole.
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