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Disinfecting a coop

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So we just bought a house and are getting chickens this weekend. The previous owners built a coop and had chickens. Do I need to disinfect the coop before I get my own chickens and how would you do that. I don't want to get it too wet as it will not dry fast.
post #2 of 7
What type of flooring does it have?
The key to a happy flock is to be there for them. You have to do your job so they can do theirs. Your coop layout is also important. It doesn't have to be fancy just functional.http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/just-a-chicken-coop Is an example of it.
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The key to a happy flock is to be there for them. You have to do your job so they can do theirs. Your coop layout is also important. It doesn't have to be fancy just functional.http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/just-a-chicken-coop Is an example of it.
Reply
post #3 of 7

Welcome!  The short answer is, you can't.  You should be able to clean it out and maybe scrub it with disinfectant, and spray with bleach, but unless it's smooth plastic or something similar, 'reasonably clean' is the best you can do.  History about the previous flock will really help.  If the property has been bird free for more than three weeks,  Mycoplasma shouldn't be an issue.  Marek's disease will linger for years, so if that was a problem, make sure your chicks are vaccinated, and then ISOLATED  completely from the area for two to three weeks.  My original coop was here when we bought the farm, but it was vacant for years, and safe.  It's wood, so not very cleanable.  Mary

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
The last bird just left yesterday finally! (We bought the house in july. Long story) all the birds were very healthy from what I know. They were god layers and active. The floor is cement and the walls are wood
Edited by cjkleck - 10/9/15 at 5:05am
post #5 of 7

If they also have a run...well...not too much you really can do, but start with healthy vaccinated birds and have fun.

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjkleck View Post

The last bird just left yesterday finally! (We bought the house in july. Long story) all the birds were very healthy from what I know. They were god layers and active. The floor is cement and the walls are wood

Did the old owners come get the chickens?

 

If they seemed healthy in the couple of months you had them, probably don't need to do anything except maybe change out the bedding.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Yes we have been at the house since the end of july. He took his sweet time moving the chickens. They did seem very healthy. I swept out the whole coop. And sprayed it with a vinegar water mix
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