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Weighing eggs?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Not sure where to put this. I plan to try to hatch some of my eggs probably not until spring though. BUT, I have a bit of a challenge. I have some darker shell layers, and candling them is really hard because I can't get a good view inside the eggs (all I see when candling is some shading, which doesn't help me any). I can see inside my white layer's eggs clearly, and am working on determining early signs of fertilization in those ones.

Anyways, I had read something about weighing them, but would that apply in this case or only during incubation? If not, does anyone have a suggestion for a good (not expensive) candling light for darker shell eggs?

I have a rooster, and he's been mating quite a bit with certain girls, others either fight or I guess he just doesn't want to mate with yet because they're younger/smaller, not sure (though he did attempt to mount one of the smaller the other day for the first time).

I don't want to risk wasting a clutch of eggs in incubation, so I want to try to learn ways to check the darker shell ones. Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 9

Weighing eggs will tell you if your humidity is correct. It has nothing to do with fertility.

Eggs should lose about 0.65% of weight each day with proper humidity.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Ok, so, how can I candle and actually tell what's going on in a darker shell egg then? I have a rooster, and I know he's been mating with several of them.

post #4 of 9

You can't candle for fertility before incubation...only after development starts.

Some can see within a few days, but it takes some practice.

 

Looking for the fertile 'bullseye' on the yolk when cracking egg for cooking will tell you if your cockbird is 'getting the job done'.

 

Candling takes practice, the more you do it the more you'll be able to 'see'.

During incubation you may never be able to see into the darker eggs, I've had some like that, must wait and hope.

At least you've got some lighter eggs so you can see if temps are good for development.

 

 

 

I candled on day 7-10-14-18 when I first started hatching.

 

First Hatch:

Day 7 - didn't see much but the air cells, which I outlined with a pencil every time I candled, maybe some veining and lumps..maybe moving...I was very disappointed.

Day 10 - could definitely see veins and some movement...maybe some clears and blood rings.

Day 14 - saw much more definition of shape, movement and realized what I had seen the previous times. Clears and blood ring more obvious.

Day 18 - pulled the now very obvious clears and blood rings. Viable chicks almost filled egg and wasn't as much movement.

 

Knew much better what to look for the next time I incubated. It just takes some practice and experience.

Candle well after sunset in a dark room, I used a cardboard template with a hole cut to fit into a utility light shade with a 60watt bulb. Also used a very bright flashlight and just my hand in a windowless room after I got better at it.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

I've seen the bullseye on the cracked eggs for cooking, and I could see a difference in the cracked ones in the yolk color being deeper than others (more of an orange than the lighter yellow). I also was able to tell on the duck eggs (my neighbor had ducks) when I went to incubate them (before even putting them in) so I was hoping I could see the difference inside the brown ones. I have lighter brown ones and then darker brown with speckling so it makes it pretty impossible to see inside though. I guess I'll just try to keep an eye on the mating and gather a clutch and hope they develop then for the darker ones. I'm hoping to hatch at least a few of certain breeds (all but 1 would be a buff mix, only 1 would be a full buff).

 

I've not had a go with chicken eggs yet for incubating, just the duck eggs, but it definitely gave me a good idea of things I should look for in development. Hopefully come spring I will be collecting a set for hatching :) I'm not going to be keeping any cockerels though from that round. Oh, and um, I have a REALLY important question, if I hatch and keep the pullets, if the father mates with them is it an issue as long as I don't pull any for hatching? I don't know what is and isn't appropriate in the world of chickens for that. *blushes*

post #6 of 9

Yolk color has nothing to do with fertility. Yolk color is simply a result of the amount of carotenes in the diet. If some have darker yolk than others, those birds are eating more things with those elements.

http://orgprints.org/18192/1/18192.pdf

 

I have extremely dark eggs too and I usually don't even bother candling.


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 10/11/15 at 11:04am

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickmomma03 View Post
 

...... Oh, and um, I have a REALLY important question, if I hatch and keep the pullets, if the father mates with them is it an issue as long as I don't pull any for hatching? I don't know what is and isn't appropriate in the world of chickens for that. *blushes*

 

 

Parent to child hatching is not a problem with chickens, some breeders do it purposely to focus on certain traits.....

......siblings might be a bit more likely to have problems. I'm not well versed in the why, but know those basics.

Might want new cockbird every few years tho.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #8 of 9

Line breeding is what most people use. That's father to daughter, grand daughter, great grand daughter, et. al.. Same goes for Mother/son etc..

But they do so with their most perfect birds.

Full brother sister is most often a no no. The reason is, their genes are identical. Good traits will be multiplied as will any faults. Too much inbreeding also causes poor vigor and hatchability.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Kewl thanks. I won't be keeping anymore cockerels, so that won't be an issue with brother to sister. :)

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