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Dose anyone know this disease?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I have a hen that's never layer eggs and has lately been kind of tired distant and very unbalanced she often separates herself from the flock and is puffed up a lot. She sometimes stands in the corner. I found her hiding out side of the coop under a bench with another hen when I went to put them up tonight and when I brought them in the other hen tried to go back out and when I closed the door she went to the corner behind the trash can and when I moved her she hid behind the chair. She isn't scared of the other hens and she never hides she always flys up to the rafters. I'm worried my original chicken was sick and now she has it and it's spreading. We have baby's sharing the area so I really need to know if there ill. any help would be appreciated
post #2 of 4

How old is she? She could be an internal layer, which is pretty common in hatchery birds since they are good producers. I would give her a good exam of feeling her breast bone for wight loss, the lower abdomen for fullness or swelling, check her crop to make sure it is emptying by morning, look at her skin especially around the vent for lice or mites. Coccidiosis might be considered if she is lethargic, puffed up, having diarrhea or blood in droppings, and not eating. That is best treated with Corid (amprollium) in the water for 5 days. Worming with Valbazen would also be something to consider if she hasn't been wormed recently. Was she vaccinated for Mareks disease? She probably could use some vitamins and electrolytes in her water, and give her a little egg or tuna to coax her to eat. Here is some reading:

http://scoopfromthecoop.nutrenaworld.com/tag/laying-issues/

http://www.chickenvet.co.uk/health-and-common-diseases/egg-laying-issues/index.aspx


Edited by Eggcessive - 10/10/15 at 6:53pm
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eggcessive View Post

How old is she? She could be an internal layer, which is pretty common in hatchery birds since they are good producers. I would give her a good exam of feeling her breast bone for wight loss, the lower abdomen for fullness or swelling, check her crop to make sure it is emptying by morning, look at her skin especially around the vent for lice or mites. Coccidiosis might be considered if she is lethargic, puffed up, having diarrhea or blood in droppings, and not eating. That is best treated with Corid (amprollium) in the water for 5 days. Worming with Valbazen would also be something to consider if she hasn't been wormed recently. Was she vaccinated for Mareks disease? She probably could use some vitamins and electrolytes in her water, and give her a little egg or tuna to coax her to eat. Here is some reading:
http://scoopfromthecoop.nutrenaworld.com/tag/laying-issues/
http://www.chickenvet.co.uk/health-and-common-diseases/egg-laying-issues/index.aspx
thank u so much for your help! If u don't mind me asking what is an internal layer?
post #4 of 4

If you read the 2 links I posted it explains that the eggs get laid internally into the abdomen. Internal laying and egg yolk peritonitis are very similar. Here is an excerpt from Merck Veterinary Manual:

 

Internal Laying

In these hens, partially or fully formed eggs are found in the abdominal cavity. Such eggs reach the cavity by reverse peristalsis of the oviduct. If they have no shell, they are often misshapen because of partial or complete absorption of the contents. Frequently, only empty shell membranes are present. No control or treatment is known. This condition is related to erratic ovulation and defective egg syndrome (see Defective or Abnormal Eggs in Poultry).

 

Egg Yolk Peritonitis

Egg peritonitis is characterized by fibrin or albumen-like material with a cooked appearance among the abdominal viscera. It is a common cause of sporadic death in layers or breeder hens, but in some flocks may become the major cause of death before or after reaching peak production and give the appearance of a contagious disease. It is diagnosed at necropsy. Peritonitis follows reverse movement of albumen and Escherichia coli bacteria from the oviduct into the abdomen. If the incidence is high, culture should be done to differentiate between Pasteurella (fowl cholera) or Salmonella infection. Antibiotic treatment of peritonitis caused by E coli infections is usually ineffective. Management of body weight and uniformity, reproductive development (ovary follicle growth and maturation), and drinking water sanitation are the best preventive strategies.

When hens have too many large ovarian follicles, a problem described as erratic oviposition and defective egg syndrome (EODES) is seen in broiler breeders. This condition is accompanied by a high incidence of double-yolked eggs, prolapses of the oviduct, internal ovulation, and/or internal laying that often results in egg peritonitis and mortality. EODES is prevented by avoiding light stimulation of underweight pullets too early and by following guidelines for body weight and uniformity, and lighting recommendations for each breeder strain. Overweight hens may also have a higher incidence of erratic ovulations and mortality associated with egg peritonitis.


Edited by Eggcessive - 10/11/15 at 1:07pm
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