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My hen is acting weird

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
My hen is almost a year old and she is walking around opening her mouth then closing it...she continually does this and at the same time she looks like her vent is contracting. I did see her drink but, really not eating much. Does anyone know what could cause this or has experienced this. I'm really worried that something is wrong.
post #2 of 7

Has it been hot?  They will pant when they are hot.  Birds don't sweat, so they pant like a dog.  Usually their wings are held out a bit from their body to help cool them as well.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

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Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Chooks View Post

Has it been hot?  They will pant when they are hot.  Birds don't sweat, so they pant like a dog.  Usually their wings are held out a bit from their body to help cool them as well.
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
its been 80 degrees and windy. I have seen them all have their mouth open when it's hot and it's not like that it's almost like she is trying to make a noise but nothing will come out and at the same time her bottom looks like it's contracting.
post #5 of 7

The vent can contract/pulse during body movements other than pooping or laying.

Sometimes they open and close their mouths and move thier head and neck around to adjust their crops.

Check her crop and see how it feels.

You might want to isolate her for a couple days to monitor her food/water intake, her poops and her crop function.

Take food away at night then check her crop first thing in the morning before giving her her food back, crop should be empty then.

Best if you can put her in a wire dog crate right in the coop and/or run so she can still see her flock mates to avoid reintegration issues later.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
I will give that a try immediately.
Thank you everyone that has taken the time to help, I really appreciate it, as I am new to this and trying to care for them to the best of my knowledge and thru research. I appreciate your time
post #7 of 7

There's a lot to learn the first year!

Lots of little details that really are pretty simple, once you know about them.

Until then it can be scary and frustrating, just keep asking questions and searching and reading and you'll build up your knowledge, it will get easier and more enjoyable.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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