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Stress during laying

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hi - Sunday of this week I found a wonderful surprise on TOP of the nest box from one of the three girls in my workshop quarantine area - her very first egg. She's a 28 week old Buff Orpington. She's been a trooper and so far also gave me an egg Monday, and another one later in the day yesterday (laid it around 5:30 pm) - and those subsequent eggs were both inside the nest box. I was home from work a bit early yesterday, and when I went in the shop to say hi and check on them, I could see she was ready and trying to lay. Her rear end and abdomen were contracting, and she was in the nest box. What was troubling was how stressed she seemed. She wasn't sitting still, kept re-positioning herself in the nest, and her mouth was hanging open. I found it a little bit cool to be able to watch her in the process, but I don't know if that was normal. It took her probably 20 minutes to get the job done (from when I first saw her - I don't know when it all started). I had left the shop and gone out to work in the yard nearby and heard the girls go nuts, so I knew when she was done. 

 

Is this because she's new to the whole thing and hasn't really gotten used to the routine yet, or is it something I should be worried about?

post #2 of 5
That's completely normal, they longer she lays the easier the eggs will come out, laying an egg is similar to giving birth, it can be rough for some, and the hen always stands up to push it out, so thick bedding is a must for uncracked eggs.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

I figured it was like giving birth based on seeing the contractions, I just hadn't read about the look of stress. Glad to know it's normal. Thanks!

post #4 of 5

I've found newer layers to be more likely to pant a bit when laying.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 5
The young ones do seem quite uncomfortable, where my older hens look like they might want to watch the television while sitting in the nest box.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
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