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Will my 15 week old chicks lay soon? Or molt? HELP!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone, 

 

     I hope everyone is well. I was wondering if i should be expecting eggs anytime soon? My 2 pullets (who are going on 15 weeks

 

tomorrow-10/17/2015) were hatched July 4, 2015. I know molting could happen this time of year and i have read up on the molting

 

process but i don't know if they will molt or not? I read somewhere that it happens at about 16-18 months of age. I need to buy more

 

feed within the next week but i don't know if i should purchase a feather fixer or a laying feed. I don't think they will molt because

 

they look fine but i am a first time chicken mama. HELP!:/ 

post #2 of 7

Welcome to the flock! :frow  Your chickens will not molt until next year about this time. As for laying, you don't say what breed you have, but average time is 20-24 weeks. However, bottom line is - when they are good and ready!

    If their combs are reddening, if they start squatting when you pet them - laying is imminent.

    Good luck, :thumbsup

Expat Brit living the dream - 40ish chickens, 2 Beagles, 2 cats, rabbits........and counting.

Blogger for: www.thehappychickencoop.com

 

    We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.     Mother Teresa

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Expat Brit living the dream - 40ish chickens, 2 Beagles, 2 cats, rabbits........and counting.

Blogger for: www.thehappychickencoop.com

 

    We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.     Mother Teresa

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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

My two who are 15 weeks are Barred Rocks (Chica and Adaline). I have one 15 week roo named Mumble (Production Red) ., and

 

five 7 week old chicks named Amelia, Abigail ( Production Reds) Bubbles, Blossom ( Buff Orphinton) and Little Buttercup ( Barred

 

Rock) I am having a wonderful time raising them and i want to do everything I can to help them flourish into an incredible flock I

 

know they can be.:D 

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

This is my mini flock ( 7 weeks)

 

 

Blossom (Buff Orphington)

 

 

 

Buttercup (Barred Rock)

 

 

 

Bubbles (Buff Orphington)

 

 

 

Abigail (Production Red)

 

 

Amelia (Production Red)

 

 

And my larger flock:

 

Chica ( Barred Rock- She has a slightly larger comb)

 

 

Mumble ( Production Red- Mt reclusive Roo)

 

 

 

Adaline (Barred Rock- stuck onto mumbles side)

 

post #5 of 7
Keep them on a non medicated grower until most if not all are laying, offer a separate bowl of oyster shells free choice, and boskelli gave you good advice.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #6 of 7

I like to feed a 'flock raiser' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat.

 

The higher protein crumble also offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer.

 

Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, I use oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

 

Animal protein (mealworms, a little cheese - beware the salt content, meat scraps) is provided during molting and if I see any feather eating.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 7

Any hatchery sex link or hatchery rock that I owned always started laying at 24 weeks.


Edited by Egghead_Jr - 10/16/15 at 5:44am

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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