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When to move 11 week old chickens outside? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by waddles99 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

I'd be surprised if they are even 'using' the heat at that age, unless they can't get away from it.....
....and be more concerned with how to integrate them with the existing flock
Oh, I think they're fine going in with the existing flock. I introduced a new chicken about a month ago simply by dropping her into the pen. They picked at her and chased her for a little bit at first but then learned to accept her. I think the same goes for these chickens, except they have more of them to disperse the aggression

WOW really?? That's usually the worst case scenario.....let us know how it goes.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

WOW really?? That's usually the worst case scenario.....let us know how it goes.
I am aware that this isn't a conventional way of doing things and I don't want to come off as cruel and mean to my birds. The existing flock isn't really too mean so it's just the easiest for me. They typically assert their dominance and then just mind their own business. Just to be clear, I would never let any birds just get thrown in and beaten up and not care. If they get pecked too badly I will take them out and separate them and spray any areas of missing feathers.
Rhode Island Reds, Wyandottes, Ameraucanas, and Welsummers
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Rhode Island Reds, Wyandottes, Ameraucanas, and Welsummers
Reply
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by waddles99 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

WOW really?? That's usually the worst case scenario.....let us know how it goes.
I am aware that this isn't a conventional way of doing things and I don't want to come off as cruel and mean to my birds. The existing flock isn't really too mean so it's just the easiest for me. They typically assert their dominance and then just mind their own business. Just to be clear, I would never let any birds just get thrown in and beaten up and not care. If they get pecked too badly I will take them out and separate them and spray any areas of missing feathers.

No, hey, if that works, it works...and sometimes it does, and yahoo if it does!!

It's just kinda rare I think...or we mostly see stories here where it doesn't work and people are looking for help.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

No, hey, if that works, it works...and sometimes it does, and yahoo if it does!!

It's just kinda rare I think...or we mostly see stories here where it doesn't work and people are looking for help.


Out of curiosity, and just in case it doesn't work this one time, what approach do you take to introducing them? I would guess its kind of like introducing a new horse, so "see not touch". Like placing them in a sectioned off area of the run?

Rhode Island Reds, Wyandottes, Ameraucanas, and Welsummers
Reply
Rhode Island Reds, Wyandottes, Ameraucanas, and Welsummers
Reply
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by waddles99 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

No, hey, if that works, it works...and sometimes it does, and yahoo if it does!!

It's just kinda rare I think...or we mostly see stories here where it doesn't work and people are looking for help.


Out of curiosity, and just in case it doesn't work this one time, what approach do you take to introducing them? I would guess its kind of like introducing a new horse, so "see not touch". Like placing them in a sectioned off area of the run?

Yup, exactly.......and sometimes you have to play it by ear and eye.

 

Here's some notes I've taken on integration that I found to be very helpful.......

......take what applies or might help and ignore the rest.

See if any of them, or the links provided at the bottom, might offer some tips that will assist you in your situation:

 

Integration of new chickens into flock.

 

Consider medical quarantine:

BYC Medical Quarantine Article

Poultry Biosecurity

BYC 'medical quarantine' search

 

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact. Integrating new birds of equal size works best.

 

For smaller chicks I used a large wire dog crate right in the coop for the smallers. I removed the crate door and put up a piece of wire fencing over the opening and bent up one corner just enough for the smallers to fit thru but the biggers could not. Feed and water inside the crate for the smallers. Make sure the smallers know how to get in and out of the crate opening before exposing them to the olders. this worked out great for me, by the time the crate was too small for the them to roost in there(about 3 weeks), they had pretty much integrated themselves to the olders.

 

If you have too many smallers to fit in a crate you can partition off part of the coop with a wire wall and make the same openings for smallers escape.

 

 

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

 

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

 

Places for the new birds to hide out of line of sight and/or up and away from any bully birds.

 

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best of mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

 

Another option, if possible, is to put all birds in a new coop and run, this takes the territoriality issues away.

 

Read up on integration.....  BYC advanced search>titles only>integration

This is good place to start reading:

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/adding-to-your-flock

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #16 of 16

Here's my approach to integration of any new chickens to the flock. Whether the new chickens are adults or chicks, they are going to be viewed by the existing flock as outsiders, and therefore suspect until after they become accustomed to one another.

 

During this period where the new chickens are getting to know the existing flock, I like to give them a week of side-by-side pens where they can see one another but any differences won't result in altercations. Since your chicks are nearly the size of adults, they won't be viewed by your flock the same as if they were baby chicks. This is one reason why I introduce my chicks to the flock as early as possible, and this year, I have actually brooded my chicks right in the run with the adults, which has worked out even better.

 

My baby chicks get access to the rest of the run at age three weeks where they come and go from their "panic room", returning to it when they feel the need to retreat from the stress of the pecking order. My chicks are eleven weeks old this week, and they are just about too big to fit through their chick-size portals into their panic room now. They have lots of perches of varying heights, a swing to hop onto when they need to get above it all, and the run is also broken up into areas where they can always find a quiet corner to retreat to. So they're about ready for me to take away the panic room.

 

I would recommend you give the chicks and the adults a week of getting acquainted before you throw them together. Have you given any thought to how you will merge the chicks into the coop with the adults? It's usually a very scary thing for chicks to have to experience roosting time since it's sometimes competitive and the chicks may be bullied by the adults. Since your chicks have spent their entire life inside a brooder, they won't understand about going into a coop and roosting at night especially with big scary adults in there.

 

I usually treat integration as a two-step process, completing the integration into the run before I attempt to move them into the coop.

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