BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Predators and Pests › Losing lots of chickens to some unknown predator
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Losing lots of chickens to some unknown predator - Page 15

post #141 of 147

I had a problem with a 35lb coon we caught it climbing up the wood pole in the corner after I had my favorite duck and my boyfriends grandsons favorite chicken (it was a barred rock rooster)  I took one night we parked our truck between the house and coop about 50 feet from the pen for 2 nights I sat on the ground by the tire and hunted the little jerk.  3rd night I shot him.  I know it sounds mean but he would have kept coming back and killing them usually once they find them this is what happened so Now I shut them in an enclosed part that they can go into the coop or out in that so far I haven't lost anymore.  But in the beginning we lost half our chickens we free range them they were younger and never returned we walked our woods and never found them.  I know for sure we have a fox den close.  and the last couple days we've caught one running our field.  I buy my hunting license to shoot these predators but I only bother them if they bother my hens.  Also as a precaution I got a Blue Healer dog and he runs our property especially at night  and so far hes kept things away from my coop.  It didn't take long to get him to understand what he was doing we'd go take walks on and off around the coop and pen after a few months he does this on our own.  He has also ran the neighbors cats off from near them and he doesn't allow my cat near the coop Ive watched him interact with her (they are friends and get a long great) he will just take his paw and hold her down when he lets her up she runs back to the house.  I have been lucky with my dogs I have four Pomrats my 7th month old now did get one of my hens and hurt her trying to play.  I brought her in the house we thought shed never make it 3 weeks of being babied and shes fine and a broody hen shes been sitting on 15 eggs going on 2 weeks

post #142 of 147

I would love to have a dog to watch over my son's place-n-animals.  Him and I have always been partial to the small terriers like Rat Terriers, the maniacal Jack Russell and the even more radical Jadg Terriers.  The problem is I wouldn't trust any of them around our chickens for one second!  These terriers breeds are natural-born-killers.  At least ours are.  They all can easily kill, and do so regularly, predators much larger than themselves.  A big boar raccoon or a possum hasn't got a chance with any of our terriers.  But, the coyotes around here hunt in packs and dine on our neighbor's dogs quite often.  At least the ones allowed to live outside at night.

 

I thought of getting a Great Pyrenees.  I'm told, and have read, that they do a fabulous job at protecting your stock.  I would think that one bred from working stock would be the safest bet.  Although I'm sure they would also be the most expensive.  There are bloodlines of German Shepherds that are great protectors of chickens and livestock.  My little 4 year-old granddaughter absolutely loves big dogs.  I should bite the bullet and get us a real LGD!  I hate acronyms!!  GSD German Shepherd Dog, LGD Livestock Guard Dog, PUA Person Using Acronyms.      

 

Is the Blue Heeler typically considered a trustworthy dog to watch over chickens and livestock?

Married 46 years. Great wife, 4 sons, 13 grandchildren! 

 

He who laughs last thinks slowest!


Give me ambiguity or give me something else.   

Reply

Married 46 years. Great wife, 4 sons, 13 grandchildren! 

 

He who laughs last thinks slowest!


Give me ambiguity or give me something else.   

Reply
post #143 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigoledude View Post
 

I would love to have a dog to watch over my son's place-n-animals.  Him and I have always been partial to the small terriers like Rat Terriers, the maniacal Jack Russell and the even more radical Jadg Terriers.  The problem is I wouldn't trust any of them around our chickens for one second!  These terriers breeds are natural-born-killers.  At least ours are.  They all can easily kill, and do so regularly, predators much larger than themselves.  A big boar raccoon or a possum hasn't got a chance with any of our terriers.  But, the coyotes around here hunt in packs and dine on our neighbor's dogs quite often.  At least the ones allowed to live outside at night.

 

I thought of getting a Great Pyrenees.  I'm told, and have read, that they do a fabulous job at protecting your stock.  I would think that one bred from working stock would be the safest bet.  Although I'm sure they would also be the most expensive.  There are bloodlines of German Shepherds that are great protectors of chickens and livestock.  My little 4 year-old granddaughter absolutely loves big dogs.  I should bite the bullet and get us a real LGD!  I hate acronyms!!  GSD German Shepherd Dog, LGD Livestock Guard Dog, PUA Person Using Acronyms.      

 

Is the Blue Heeler typically considered a trustworthy dog to watch over chickens and livestock?


Blue Heeler would be more likely to go after the chickens than a LGD but even they have to be trained and aren't really trustworthy till 1.5-2 years. Against coyotes you would need more than 1 LGD no matter the breed. Coyotes are pros at divide and conquer. They will either gang up on the dog or have 1 distract while another sneaks in and grabs chickens. Most LGDs work well as teams as well with 1 going out to meet threat while other stays back with stock or taking turns guarding. LGDs are great but the are not an easy or inexpensive fix.

6 goats, 4 dogs, 12 layers and 15 new chicks of a wide variety.
Reply
6 goats, 4 dogs, 12 layers and 15 new chicks of a wide variety.
Reply
post #144 of 147
Since losing all my chicks from the last batch I have done some things to help manage this problem. I agree with bigoledude 100% and have been using this exact method with my dog proof traps. I put cat food mixed up with peanut butter and a couple ounces of honey in my traps and spread a little on the ground around the traps. I have 8 dog proof traps around my yard and use a 22 rifle to dispatch the animals after they're caught. I actually just got a raccoon this morning. Since setting the traps I have have dispatched 3 opossums and 2 raccoons. Still experimenting with baits to find the best but so far peanut butter, dog food and honey is working the best. I don't like to kill animals but at the same time don't like losing my flock. As long as they know there is an easy meal for them in your back yard they will keep finding a way to get to your hens. Raccoons are very smart animals. For this reason I will take it upon myself to lower the population of predators on my land. I won't be comfortable raising chicks in an outdoor run until I do.
post #145 of 147

I'm unsure of what breeds are good to protect chickens but I have had my blue heeler for a year now and he was very easy to train and has never hurt any of my chickens or ducks even now my goose has hatched 4 babies and when he gets close the male goose runs him off chasing him and he just stays clear of them.  I free range my birds from dusk till dawn I can open my door point and say go get mommas birds take them to the barn and he will go run the length of my field round them and push them back toward their coop.  He gets the the tree he stops and lets them go about their business.  I have one corner of my field that we keep them outta cause there's a fox den 100 yards off our property line.  I got baby geese that my goose hatched Saturday he checks on them but never bothers them.  I got 7 baby chicks and 2 ducks in my house in a bin its been cold at night here.  when I take them out during the day he guards them but never scares them just Sunday we had big Crow try to swoop in and get them He ran it off.  I understand all dogs have that instant to be a predator but Ive had really good luck with him and my 4 pomrats.  my pup at 6 months old killed 2 of my chickens but we worked with him a lot and now he can be out and doesn't bother them he killed them by accidentally trying to play with them.  Hes so devoted that he learned quick that they are mommas birds. and he doesnt bother them anymore sounds mean but used a shock collar twice and scolded him when he ran at them that he no longer does it even when I take him to the pen.  It probley helped my male goose bit him in the face once as well. 

post #146 of 147


My latest kill Sunday afternoon we watched it jump the bird one shot with my 30-06 at 180 yards just a cool picture the way he still had the bird in its mouth
post #147 of 147
Your photo made my day. Lost two to the red beast today.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Predators and Pests
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Predators and Pests › Losing lots of chickens to some unknown predator