New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Black Copper Marans Egg Size

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

My black copper Marans have been laying eggs for almost 3 months, it seems like the eggs  are on small to medium sizes.  Is that the normal size for BCMs eggs?


Edited by Spartan22 - 10/20/15 at 8:22am
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan22 View Post
 

My black copper Marans have been laying eggs for almost 3 months, it seems like the eggs  are on small to medium sizes.  Is that the normal size for BCMs eggs?

  Hi.

 Over 60 grams is normal. It helps to get a digital postal scale which will zero out the tare and weigh in both ounces and grams. That way you can put the egg in a small bowl and zero it out so you are just weighing the egg, not the bowl. Plus can translate the weight into both grams or ounces. see ebay.

 Best,

 Karen

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
All 3 of my black copper Marans quit laying 3 weeks ago. Is that normal? I know Marans are not consistent layers but that was too fast too soon. They just started laying last August. None of the same age hens quit laying(barred rocks, RIR)
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
post #4 of 6

Hi,

  The silly weather this Fall has been messing with my birds too. They started sitting eggs and hatching chicks in Aug. and Sept.!  It was a colder summer here in western PA and when we hit the warm Indian Summer the hens thought it was time to hatch eggs, sigh.

   Do your hens need to be wormed? Buy a Halloween pumpkin . Cut it in half and lay it out for the birds. Pumpkin seeds are a natural wormer for chickens. Put grit out for them too. They need it if they are eating pumpkin. The grit not only helps grind up the pumpkin, the grit which passes out of the bird helps keep pathogens from adhering to the gastrointestinal tract. I get my granite grit from Agway. Here's  research paper I wrote a while back. All 4 posts.  Feeding schedule is on the 2nd page of the PDF in post 4. : 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/891051/the-science-of-feeding-grit-to-poultry

     Also sprout some oats for your birds. Feed them sprouted oats which are 4 thru 7 days old. 1 tthru 3 days old is grain feed, fed as part of their daily ration. On the 4th day, a nutritional change happens in the sprout and it becomes green feed. Fed as a supplement to the daily ration, 4-7 day old sprouts are known for bringing hens into layand helping the cocks create more robust sperm, which hopefully results in more robust chicks.

   There is no nutritional advantage to feeding oats older than 7 days. However, there is a chance the older sprouts than 7 days may go sour and be ruined. Your sprouted oats should always smell fresh and clean and feel crisp in your hand. If they smell foul or feel slimy the they are foul. Throw them out and start again. 

   Feed 1 cubic inch per day per bird. If you happen to feed them past bowel tolerance and they poop gets a bit soft, just back off the quanitity a bit and they will firm up again, smile.

  I get my oats from Plotspike. They are not GMO, but specially line bred, created by Louisiana State University back at the turn of the century.  I use Plotspike Forage Oats and buy them at Tractor Supply Company. 24.99 for 50 lbs. about 1/2 that for 25 lbs. (which is plenty). URL below has excellent history and "how to" on sprouting oats. Read pages 24 thru 29. 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/425134/anybody-raise-sprouts-to-feed-the-chickens/230

 Why forage oats and what are they? Forage oats are the kind of seeds which farmers and hunters plant in feed plots for their grazing animals and wildlife. Feed oats are oats which are fed in the barn to animals. I always tell folk to feed forage oats because I have found that the historical type to feed and because in times gone by, feed oats were often dipped in an antifungal solution to keep them from molding. This also kept them from sprouting and they would just get slimy instead of sprouting. Plus , personally, I believe the overall quality of nutrition in the forage oats is higher. These forage oats from Plotspike were specially developed and to be delicious to wildlife. I do not have research to support this but overall I believe the quality of nutrition to be higher in this smaller specially bred grain than in feed oats bought in quantity from unknown sources.  http://www.plotspike.com

 On another note, if your birds are starting to molt, get some Nutrena Feather Fixer feed. It is specially made and just excellent for helping birds get thru the molt. They grow back in just lovely! Tractor Supply : circa 15.99 for 40 lbs.

Do not feed to birds under 16 weeks old. I am feeding it to my molting birds right now after hearing the glowing reports from other BYCer's. Wow, what a difference from other years. My stud cock is just glowing and his feathers are stunning as they grow back in. I have the birds younger than 16 weeks in a different coop/run.  http://www.nutrenaworld.com/products/poultry/naturewise-poultry/feather-fixer/

 Best Success,

 Karen


Edited by 3riverschick - 11/15/15 at 6:54am

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks ms. 3rivers!
My hens have been on Pumpkins & apples (cored) for a month now, since the over abundance from friends and my garden. I will certainly try the feather fixer for my 4 molters(silver laced Wyandottes). Thanks for the ideas of oat sprouts, I'll try it, now just a matter of finding a good source in NE Ohio.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan22 View Post

Thanks ms. 3rivers!
My hens have been on Pumpkins & apples (cored) for a month now, since the over abundance from friends and my garden. I will certainly try the feather fixer for my 4 molters(silver laced Wyandottes). Thanks for the ideas of oat sprouts, I'll try it, now just a matter of finding a good source in NE Ohio.


Hi,

 More than welcome. I get my forage oats at Tractor Supply. Probably any big hunting store would have them. They are used a lot to make deer plots. list of 10 TCS stores near Cleveland ( triangle from Ashtabula to Canton to 1/2 way between Cleveland and Sandusky)

http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/store-locator?city=cleveland&state=OH&zipCode=

 Best,

 Karen


Edited by 3riverschick - 11/15/15 at 1:08pm

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: