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Help identifying a predator - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imachicklvr2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

No animal kills for 'fun'...they kill when they are hungry and they may kill more than they can eat at one time and cache them for later.

Dogs, cats, humans...all animals and all kill for fun.  I have lost 4 chickens to my neighbor's fat old lab that chewed through a layer of hardware cloth and chain link fence to get to them. He looked like he was having a great time.

Most animals killing is prompted by instinct or actual need for sustenance.

Humans are a different story.

Don't project human 'emotion' or thought processes onto other animals.   

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Most animals killing is prompted by instinct or actual need for sustenance.
Humans are a different story.
Don't project human 'emotion' or thought processes onto other animals.   

Yeah, lol I probably shouldn't have typed in "play" up there.... It's "honing hunting skills", like a cat " playing" with a dead mouse... Practicing with something that doesn't run away tongue.png

They do look like they enjoy it though, probably more satisfaction that they're a good hunter.... Until its YOUR birds they're practicing on! I'd rather they take the bodies with them rather than leave them there for me to find; it seems like mockery. sad.png
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #13 of 13

A dog probable would have killed most or all of your chickens. I'm inclined to say it was a mink. Try putting a live trap near the coop and see what you catch because the predator will be back and might be more interested in a pile of dead meat than a chicken head that it has to fight to obtain.

 

Good luck and keep us posted.

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