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WOW, don't know what the correct forum is for this question - MOVING MY GIRLS

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Ok, we live in florida and have 40 chickens from newly hatched to 1.5 years old.

We are putting our house up for sale and moving back to Kentucky.

I REALLY need suggestions as to how i am going to accomplish moving

all my girls 1000 miles without killing them. I know, for certain that they

will have to be moved in a non stop trip of about 20 hours. I'm worried that the stress from 

bouncing around inside an enclosed trailer or my enclosed truck bed will be doom for them.

I really don't want to give them away because they are pets not livestock but i dont

want to kill them either. I don't know yet how i will come up with a temp cage to hold them

or how to make sure they have access to food and water that won't spill. Im stressed

trying to figure out if this can even be done. Please give me your thoughts and if anyone

has any experience moving a flock. 

Thanks in advance.


Edited by bevis - 10/21/15 at 1:00pm
post #2 of 4

Deep breath - you are making the whole situation more stressful on yourself than it needs to be.   Do you have any idea of when you will be moving?  The season will play heavily into how you can best approach this. 

As for it having to be a non-stop trip, that is not really a given as long as you are not making the move in the heat of summer.  Cold temperatures (winter) are not a big concern as long as they are in a draft free area (ie in the enclosed trailer).  For everyone's safety, cages will be important vs. the temptation of leaving them loose within the trailer (if that has crossed your mind).  The extra barrier of enclosed cages gives you the ability to have control over the situation at times when you must open the trailer (ie at stops to check them, water breaks, etc) without worrying about birds getting loose.  You can easily take this as a two day trip without any sort of real risk to them as long as they are properly housed/caged, have feed/water and temperatures are not dangerously hot (keep in mind that outside temperatures are not necessarily reflective of the temperatures inside an enclosed space with no cllimate control) - does the trailer have vents that can be open to help move air which will help with temperature control and air quality?

Where are we going, and why are we in this hand basket?
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Where are we going, and why are we in this hand basket?
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post #3 of 4
Well, now might be the time to get rid of any non-productive hens and unwanted cockerals. I know they are pets, but there are probably a few that you aren't as attached to that you could part with.

Don't worry about needing to supply a lot of food during the trip. Birds can go 20 hours without eating. Chances are they will be stressed by the move anyway and won't want to eat. Water is critical though, but putting a cucumber or some watermelon in with them is a good method to ensure they have a way to stay hydrated. Be sure they have access to clean water with electrolytes before you pack them up and that you offer some mid-trip if you stop for any length of time. Moistened food travels well, doesn't spill and helps keep them hydrated.

I would probably use a trailer rather than a truck bed. Put small groups of similar age birds into wire dog crates. Make sure you secure the crates, especially if you have to stack them. Pull the birds of the roost at dusk and travel through the night if you can. Their crops will be full, they will be easier to catch, and they will be more likely to settle down for the ride. Doing the bulk of the driving at night also prevents the temperature in the trailer from climbing due to sun. If the trailer isn't well ventilated you'll need to stop frequently and open it up to allow air exchange.
Edited by TalkALittle - 10/22/15 at 6:22am
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 

Well, now might be the time to get rid of any non-productive hens and unwanted cockerals

Nope, we are attached to each and every one of them, producing or not,  and we only have hens. :)

 

 putting a cucumber or some watermelon in with them is a good method to ensure they have a way to stay hydrated.

WOW, EXCELENT IDEA, i did not think of that !!!

 

Moistened food travels well, doesn't spill and helps keep them hydrated.

​I feed fresh milled mash food from the mill but do it dry. Another excellent idea.

 

Pull the birds of the roost at dusk and travel through the night if you can. Their crops will be full, they will be easier to catch, and they will be more likely to settle down for the ride. Doing the bulk of the driving at night also prevents the temperature in the trailer from climbing due to sun.

My thoughts prior to posting this thread. I figured the same thing

 

The trailer is 24' long x 8' wide and has a openable vent in the top. I can use that during driving depending on the temp

 

GREAT SUGGESTIONS!!!!!

 

We are looking at houses in KY right now but that process of buying and selling can happen fast or painfully slow.

The weather will dictate a lot of the decisions.

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