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Just built our girls this little coop! Winterizing? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Forum members in Nova Scotia and on the Michigan peninsula have discussed chickens sleeping in trees during the winter without getting frostbite. These are chicken with single combs, not the small combs normally recommended for colder climates. I’ve seen chickens sleep in trees with overnight lows below zero Fahrenheit. We had one stretch it never got above zero Fahrenheit for eight straight days and nights. The chickens were fine. Sonya if you are getting chickens with frostbite in Georgia don’t you think you just might be doing something wrong? For the sake of your chickens think about that for a minute.

Obviously chickens sleeping in trees have great ventilation. But they have another advantage. They have the freedom to move around and get out of direct strong winds. If given a chance they can take care of themselves pretty well.

People further north than I am have solved frostbite problems by providing more ventilation, not locking them up tighter.

Lancaster my advice for winterizing in Oregon is to not worry about keeping the area where the chickens are warm. They don’t need that. Keep strong breezes off of them (at least the option for them to move to shelter if they want to) and their down/feathers will keep them warm, just like the wild birds that overwinter there.

Plenty of ventilation is important.

Don’t baby them. No matter the weather give them the option to go outside if they wish. Mine normally stay in protected areas if a strong cold wind is blowing but even with temperatures below zero Fahrenheit mine go outside as long as the wind is calm. It was four degrees above zero Fahrenheit when I took this picture. Yes, that is ice from their waterer.




If there is snow on the ground they tend to avoid it for a day or two until they get used to it. With these they were already outside when the snow fell so they never bothered to come in.


When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you all so much. Everyone has really good pieces of advice. Ridge runner how will I know if they are getting a strong breeze? How does one identify a draft or an area that may be getting too much wind?
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lancasterflock View Post

Thank you all so much. Everyone has really good pieces of advice. Ridge runner how will I know if they are getting a strong breeze? How does one identify a draft or an area that may be getting too much wind?

If it literally ruffles their feathers, it's too strong.....if the feather can't stay in place, they can't hold the body heat.

That's the short answer, I'm sure RR will provide more comprehensive and detailed info.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 16

Good point, and it's unlikely to do that inside a building.

 

As Ridgerunner said. "Don’t baby them."


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 10/23/15 at 8:33am

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm starting to think that alot of us chicken people ultimatley want to do wants best for our flock. Some may think something works better for them and their flock than it may be for another.
The message I am frequently getting is that chickens are pretty hardy. As long as you keep their area clean and dry all is well. It rained pretty good the other day here in southern Oregon and it really, really made a mess of the run. The straw out in the run was so heavy. After a few days of that the straw in the run started smelling like mold so I removed ALL the straw from the run to bare ground. I think I might throw our fall leaves in the run for them to tear around and hopefully break down. The straw is a no go in an uncovered run.
I'm thinking I may need to build a covered area for them and soon.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lancasterflock View Post

I'm starting to think that alot of us chicken people ultimatley want to do wants best for our flock. Some may think something works better for them and their flock than it may be for another.
The message I am frequently getting is that chickens are pretty hardy. As long as you keep their area clean and dry all is well. It rained pretty good the other day here in southern Oregon and it really, really made a mess of the run. The straw out in the run was so heavy. After a few days of that the straw in the run started smelling like mold so I removed ALL the straw from the run to bare ground. I think I might throw our fall leaves in the run for them to tear around and hopefully break down. The straw is a no go in an uncovered run.
I'm thinking I may need to build a covered area for them and soon.

Just don't put anything too deep at first..... leaves will mat up and get moldy too.

 I go light with what ever I put in there then throw some scratch out there every afternoon so they will keep things stirred up.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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