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Staph! Yikes!

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

My college son's class assignment for biology was to get samples of animal "poop" to see what would show up in petri dishes within 48 hours. While our dogs, cat, and even rabbit came back normally, our chicken poop is filled with staph! What does that mean? How do we get rid of the staph? Is it safe to clean the coop, collect and eat the eggs, etc.? Yikes!

post #2 of 5
I will be reading this thread with curiosity, as I'd like to hear from others more experienced than I.

But my guess is something like this:

Just because your chickens are showing staph, it does not mean necessarily that they are ill. IIRC, staph is most dangerous if it gets into the bloodstream. I think there are also different types of staph and my guess is some are more dangerous than others.

If your chickens appear healthy, I'd take a preventative route in the form of increasing probiotics in their diet. Personally, I'd probably skip the yogurt in this case and go straight for the chicken specific probiotics, such as sav a chik, probios, or others. Increase their dosage slowly over 10 days and retest. Continue increasing up to double the recommended dose for another 10 days and retest. Might be wise to also add a vitamin/mineral supplement, but don't go overboard if they are appearing healthy.

If your chickens appear ill, then it is probably antibiotic time. Not sure what to use there.

Mind you, I am no chicken expert here... This is just what I'd personally do if it was my flock.
post #3 of 5
Also, if he hasn't already, ask your son to ask his professor about the staff and what it might mean.
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdirt View Post

Just because your chickens are showing staph, it does not mean necessarily that they are ill. IIRC, staph is most dangerous if it gets into the bloodstream. I think there are also different types of staph and my guess is some are more dangerous than others.

 

I agree. Staph is found in the soil and I believe healthy chickens may have it in their intestines. Staph, ecoli and other nasties are common in households and kitchens too, those folks that grow their own bread yeast are usually (unknowingly) growing staph too.

 

If they were my chickens and they seemed healthy I wouldn't worry about it, though I also wouldn't be slathering chicken poo on any open wounds. :)


Edited by Sonya9 - 10/24/15 at 9:28am
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thank you! Much food for thought here!

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