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Can chickens eat clams?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
We have some extra. Is it safe for my girls to eat them?? smile.png
post #2 of 9

I would highly suggest not to feed your birds clams even if they are cooked. It is best to feed chickens food that they are familiar with such as bugs and veggies.  lams are very foreign to chickens and could make them very sick.

Bantam: Polish, Rocks, Hamburgs, Catalanas, and one large Delaware.
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Bantam: Polish, Rocks, Hamburgs, Catalanas, and one large Delaware.
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post #3 of 9
My chickens have picked at lobster and crab and shrimp shells and they've been fine.
post #4 of 9

Mine LOVE shrimp tails...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad of the coop View Post
 

I would highly suggest not to feed your birds clams even if they are cooked. It is best to feed chickens food that they are familiar with such as bugs and veggies.  lams are very foreign to chickens and could make them very sick.

 

Please provide your source...

 

Personally, mine have eaten leftover cooked clams (with pasta), with no ill effects.

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

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Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #5 of 9

It is just my belief and feeding foods that are way out of their environment can pose an unnecessary risk to the birds health. It is some what like if vegetarians start to eat meat again and some can transition back whereas others get very sick. So I guess it is how much risk a person is willing to take with their birds. Personally, I would not feed clams to my birds.

Bantam: Polish, Rocks, Hamburgs, Catalanas, and one large Delaware.
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Bantam: Polish, Rocks, Hamburgs, Catalanas, and one large Delaware.
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post #6 of 9
Cooked clams, in moderation, should not hurt your hens. Free ranging chickens will eat a lot worse things than cooked clams.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by enola View Post

Cooked clams, in moderation, should not hurt your hens. Free ranging chickens will eat a lot worse things than cooked clams.

I agree, in fact fish meal or seafood byproducts is currently part of commercial chicken food.  In short clams (both raw and cooked) does a chicken good.    

 

As for chickens being "familiar" with other foods like legumes, you can't (at least I can't) chase a hen fast enough to force her to eat a raw soybean.  However roasted and expelled soybeans make up a large part of the protein in most commercial chicken rations.


Edited by chickengeorgeto - 10/27/15 at 4:44pm
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #8 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dad of the coop View Post
 

It is just my belief and feeding foods that are way out of their environment can pose an unnecessary risk to the birds health.

 

Ok, now I understand.

 

You are certainly entitled to your opinion or a belief.

 

I thought you were referring to some study that I wasn't aware of.

 

I have not found any empirical evidence to prove with factual certainty that chickens eating clams is harmful....

 

As I said, mine get clams every so often as they are one of my favorites, and clams don't do well as leftovers.

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys!! :)

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