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Old Coop/new Chicken farmer

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Several years ago my wife and I bought a small farm that was in her family. Anyway there was a regular barn, a milk house and a chicken coop. The chicken coop ended up being storage.

 I thought I should start raising chickens for eggs so I cleaned the coop out and now have raised14 chicks ready to start laying any day now,  3 chicks that are 3 weeks old and just bought 12 more to be picked up in 2 weeks.

 My question is on the coop I have 2 of the wind direction revolving fresh air/vents. Should I seal them in the winter? I'm northern Ohio and it does get pretty cold here for a good month or so.

 Also should they have a screen on them to keep things out? 

 

 Thanks for letting me join in the Backyard Chicken forum!!

post #2 of 6
If critters can get in I would put I would put something on it. And for plugging off in winter I would If it let's a draft in but you do need ventilation so you don't want to seal the coop up to tight.
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 


OK! I thank you for your in put! I have a series of windows on the west side of the coop, and am clearing this area out of brush and trees. I think after I get it cleaned up the bad critters won't be able to attack from the roof!

 As far as a draft I will work on that one.

 Thank you much!!!

post #4 of 6

Welcome to BYC!

 

Ventilation is just as, if not more, important in the winter as summer.

You want most your ventilation up high with some down low.

 

'Drafts' can be hard to define...you want air movement but not a strong enough draft to literally 'ruffle feathers'.

Just read a great analogy:

When you're wearing a down coat in freezing weather, it's nice and warm.... until you unzip it!

Strong winds parting the birds feathers are like unzipping your down coat.

Check out the excellent article in my signature about Ventilation.

 

Any opening to the coop should be covered with well attached 1/2" hardware cloth for night time security against predators.

 

Curious as to how you are going to integrate 3 different age groups of birds?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 


Thank you for your info.

 

 I was pretty sure they should stay open for vent. I will get up on the roof and cover the opening with the 1/2 inch hardware cloth. Right now that is the only vent for the building. I will work on something down lower too.

 

 As for the 3 different age groups, I have a pretty good size coop 16ft x 30ft. Which I am dividing into 2 sections. I also have another out building 8ft x 12ft, that is where I will put the 3.

 

 Pretty sure I read where you can introduce new chickens into another group as long as they are similar to size.

Keep them separated but where they are next to each other. Which they will be. 

 

 If I read this wrong I guess it will be pretty interesting around here.

 Thanks again.

post #6 of 6

Oh....  Nice amount of space!!

You could do several splits in there so they can all see each other....and maybe some littles doors in the barriers, let them integrate themselves.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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