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Creative coyote deterrents? - Page 3

post #21 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy hairbrain View Post

I am not a great shot and I never see the evil preditors till after the deed is done. I still want advice about my lone hen. She is safe as i wont allow any more free range till She is safe.

I want to free range too. But if cats can't get away from these coyotes, I doubt chickens will either.

I bought my birds from a guy that will sell you anything from chicks to full grown layers. Maybe you can find a breeder who can set you up with new birds of a similar age to your last bird.

Well it's, alright now,

I learned my lesson well. See ya,

can't please everyone, so ya,

gotta please yourself.

 

The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren Bennis~
 

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Well it's, alright now,

I learned my lesson well. See ya,

can't please everyone, so ya,

gotta please yourself.

 

The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren Bennis~
 

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post #22 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy hairbrain View Post

I am not a great shot and I never see the evil preditors till after the deed is done. I still want advice about my lone hen. She is safe as i wont allow any more free range till She is safe.


The only thing I can suggest, as I don't have any ideas other than getting another hen, is if you can find an unbreakable mirror so she can keep herself company with her reflection like they do with exotic birds. It's a thought until someone comes along with something better.

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

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You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

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post #23 of 64

I guess I'd be a bit anxious about putting poison out, as someone's pet who got away (i.e. Fido or Fluffy) could accidentally eat it too. I do like the predator eyes. We have a sensor light right next to our coop, which is close to our garage. I think the sensor light helps a lot.

post #24 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeafBlade12345 View Post

Nite eyes work great for me, and we have coyotes come into our yard daily, chasing rabbits and raccoons, which are also scared off by the eyes. I use the red nite eyes, I tested with white and yellow and red worked the most effectively. I hope your problem is solved safely and efficiently. You can also use paintball guns or BB guns if possible. Good luck!

That's what I use, too. They're all "double" LED, so they look like pairs of eyes flashing... which is more realistic than the single LED's.

Jack of all trades... master of none. I know a little about everything... and a lot about nothing. I is what I are...

 

3 Production Reds - 1 Red Sexlink - 1 Brown Leghorn - 7 Barred Plymouth Rocks - 12 Standard Single Comb Rhode Island Reds - and - 1 Standard Rose Comb Rhode Island Red

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Jack of all trades... master of none. I know a little about everything... and a lot about nothing. I is what I are...

 

3 Production Reds - 1 Red Sexlink - 1 Brown Leghorn - 7 Barred Plymouth Rocks - 12 Standard Single Comb Rhode Island Reds - and - 1 Standard Rose Comb Rhode Island Red

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post #25 of 64

I would like to jump in here to state my opinion. I am not fond of coyotes, either, but I am also not in favor of poison or any other long, torturous death of a predator of any kind. Let's face it - if a coyote gets to our chickens, it's generally because they're free ranging and that loss is then on us. I free range, I have lost birds to coyotes. (It's not quite the same as something like a raccoon who will spend ALL NIGHT working on getting into the coop.) When we're ranging our chickens, they are an easy meal for just about everything. My problem with poison is the unintended targets you may kill. A lot of animals are attracted to the sweetness of the antifreeze. Your own cats or dogs, for instance. Or a neighbor's pet, or other wildlife that has had no interest in your chickens. And the treble hook method - I'm not even going to go there. You can hate an animal, but to kill so cruelly is totally unethical in my opinion. I am not against eliminating a persistent predator, but do not believe an animal should suffer, either. I think part of our responsibility as humans is to kill as cleanly and quickly as possible. In the OP's case, those coyotes are a danger and a menace. If OP is not in a position to eliminate them, I would suggest hotwire around the perimeter of their property until state or local wildlife officials can get rid of them. They've become way too used to humans if they just trot off a ways when OP goes out and yells at them. As far as cats and chickens go, lock up what's left for awhile until the coyotes realize that the buffet is closed and move on if you can't kill them quickly and humanely. Otherwise, be prepared to continue to suffer losses. 

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #26 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbi-j View Post
 

I would like to jump in here to state my opinion. I am not fond of coyotes, either, but I am also not in favor of poison or any other long, torturous death of a predator of any kind. Let's face it - if a coyote gets to our chickens, it's generally because they're free ranging and that loss is then on us. I free range, I have lost birds to coyotes. (It's not quite the same as something like a raccoon who will spend ALL NIGHT working on getting into the coop.) When we're ranging our chickens, they are an easy meal for just about everything. My problem with poison is the unintended targets you may kill. A lot of animals are attracted to the sweetness of the antifreeze. Your own cats or dogs, for instance. Or a neighbor's pet, or other wildlife that has had no interest in your chickens. And the treble hook method - I'm not even going to go there. You can hate an animal, but to kill so cruelly is totally unethical in my opinion. I am not against eliminating a persistent predator, but do not believe an animal should suffer, either. I think part of our responsibility as humans is to kill as cleanly and quickly as possible. In the OP's case, those coyotes are a danger and a menace. If OP is not in a position to eliminate them, I would suggest hotwire around the perimeter of their property until state or local wildlife officials can get rid of them. They've become way too used to humans if they just trot off a ways when OP goes out and yells at them. As far as cats and chickens go, lock up what's left for awhile until the coyotes realize that the buffet is closed and move on if you can't kill them quickly and humanely. Otherwise, be prepared to continue to suffer losses. 

+1. Anyone who has ever hunted knows that a clean kill is the only way to take an animal's life... even if it is based on revenge. Reckless scattering of poison is totally irresponsible, as poison doesn't care who ingests it. Never, ever be that cold and heartless. 

Jack of all trades... master of none. I know a little about everything... and a lot about nothing. I is what I are...

 

3 Production Reds - 1 Red Sexlink - 1 Brown Leghorn - 7 Barred Plymouth Rocks - 12 Standard Single Comb Rhode Island Reds - and - 1 Standard Rose Comb Rhode Island Red

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Jack of all trades... master of none. I know a little about everything... and a lot about nothing. I is what I are...

 

3 Production Reds - 1 Red Sexlink - 1 Brown Leghorn - 7 Barred Plymouth Rocks - 12 Standard Single Comb Rhode Island Reds - and - 1 Standard Rose Comb Rhode Island Red

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post #27 of 64
Thread Starter 
I admit, when I started this post I was really hopeful that there was some creative humane way to scare coyotes off that I hadn't thought of. Being a huge wildlife and nature lover, I couldn't bring myself to shoot them even if it was legal for me. But, I'm quickly becoming tired of continually trying to chase them off and I am realizing that they really do have this area figured out and are not safely coexisting anymore.

They have learned that many people are gone during the week days. We didn't see them at all over the weekend, but at 2:00pm today one was back in my yard (I'm a stay at home mom with three young kids right now, which is why I'm here to see them while all my neighbors are gone). They really do seem too used to people for comfort. I threw a frisbee at this one today, but he just stared at it as it landed in front of him. When I charged full force screaming and waving another frisbee, he took off, but I really don't have the time or energy to keep up with this. I plan to discuss it with our county animal control later this week. In the mean time, my chickens are always locked up in hardware cloth and my kids are never out without me standing guard.

I do appreciate all the suggestions on this thread, because I do completely understand how many feel driven to eliminate them...my anger and frustration has grown so much in the past few weeks!
post #28 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by avocadoeggs View Post

I admit, when I started this post I was really hopeful that there was some creative humane way to scare coyotes off that I hadn't thought of. Being a huge wildlife and nature lover, I couldn't bring myself to shoot them even if it was legal for me. But, I'm quickly becoming tired of continually trying to chase them off and I am realizing that they really do have this area figured out and are not safely coexisting anymore.

They have learned that many people are gone during the week days. We didn't see them at all over the weekend, but at 2:00pm today one was back in my yard (I'm a stay at home mom with three young kids right now, which is why I'm here to see them while all my neighbors are gone). They really do seem too used to people for comfort. I threw a frisbee at this one today, but he just stared at it as it landed in front of him. When I charged full force screaming and waving another frisbee, he took off, but I really don't have the time or energy to keep up with this. I plan to discuss it with our county animal control later this week. In the mean time, my chickens are always locked up in hardware cloth and my kids are never out without me standing guard.

I do appreciate all the suggestions on this thread, because I do completely understand how many feel driven to eliminate them...my anger and frustration has grown so much in the past few weeks!

Honestly, if you can't bear the thought of eliminating them, electric fencing would be a good option for you. (It would be a good option until they've been removed, too.)  You can shut it off when the kiddos are outside, or let them learn the way most farm kids do (although I wouldn't recommend it for very small ones...) Your dogs will also learn real quick to keep their noses and tails down if they decide to go under it. (It took my last dog one time - he got the tip of his tail stung) For the most part, we try to coexist with our local wildlife. Unless they're persistent and refuse to leave, they are discouraged from being here rather than eliminated. Well, except for skunks, but that's because they are one of the biggest problem animals around here as far as rabies is concerned, but that's a whole 'nother discussion. Raccoons are left alone unless they become a threat. Coyotes aren't usually about except at night around here, and I'm not going to hunt them down in my jammies. The dog and cat stay in at night, the chickens are locked up, so I don't worry too much about them. In the winter, some local clubs have coyote hunts on Saturdays and that helps keep the population somewhat in check. I'm interested in knowing what you find for a solution. Wishing you the best. 

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #29 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by avocadoeggs View Post

I admit, when I started this post I was really hopeful that there was some creative humane way to scare coyotes off that I hadn't thought of. Being a huge wildlife and nature lover, I couldn't bring myself to shoot them even if it was legal for me. But, I'm quickly becoming tired of continually trying to chase them off and I am realizing that they really do have this area figured out and are not safely coexisting anymore.

They have learned that many people are gone during the week days. We didn't see them at all over the weekend, but at 2:00pm today one was back in my yard (I'm a stay at home mom with three young kids right now, which is why I'm here to see them while all my neighbors are gone). They really do seem too used to people for comfort. I threw a frisbee at this one today, but he just stared at it as it landed in front of him. When I charged full force screaming and waving another frisbee, he took off, but I really don't have the time or energy to keep up with this. I plan to discuss it with our county animal control later this week. In the mean time, my chickens are always locked up in hardware cloth and my kids are never out without me standing guard.

I do appreciate all the suggestions on this thread, because I do completely understand how many feel driven to eliminate them...my anger and frustration has grown so much in the past few weeks!

If you're close enough to land a frisbee in front of a coyote, and you aren't an Olympic frisbee distance champion, this coyote if far too close for comfort. If I didn't want to kill it outright, here's what I would do... I would yell at it, and then I would aim my 12 guage shotgun about 3' in front of it, and fire off a #6 - #8 shotshell. As soon as it turned to run, I'd put another round in it's rump. While this won't kill the coyote, it will sting enough that it will remember it from now on. If it ever came within sight again, I can assure you that yelling at it will make it think it's butt's about to catch fire again. I've used this method for stray dogs that refuse to leave, and they always seem a lot more cooperative afterwards. I suppose I'd be the same way after getting peppered with birdshot...


Edited by Ur-ur-ur-urrr - 11/2/15 at 6:34pm

Jack of all trades... master of none. I know a little about everything... and a lot about nothing. I is what I are...

 

3 Production Reds - 1 Red Sexlink - 1 Brown Leghorn - 7 Barred Plymouth Rocks - 12 Standard Single Comb Rhode Island Reds - and - 1 Standard Rose Comb Rhode Island Red

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Jack of all trades... master of none. I know a little about everything... and a lot about nothing. I is what I are...

 

3 Production Reds - 1 Red Sexlink - 1 Brown Leghorn - 7 Barred Plymouth Rocks - 12 Standard Single Comb Rhode Island Reds - and - 1 Standard Rose Comb Rhode Island Red

Reply
post #30 of 64
I think it is a multitude of things that keep coyotes away from my livestock and crops. I use:

Solar powered nite eyes, was skeptical at first but worked great

Sprinkler(motion activated), works very well as it is loud and disconcerting. A bit pricey though

Secure coop/pen, self explanatory

Dog: I have a dog that marks his territory around the garden, orchard, etc., things have been much easier since adding him into the equation

Other options:

Fencing, using electric is always ideal, but for some people it is not an option, dogs and kids usually learn to stay away fast

Paintball guns/BB guns: work amazingly well after a shot or two at keeping predators at bay

Also, male urine around the yard helps, coyotes smell the testosterone in the urine

Strobe lights, flashy and sometimes unsettling to other animals.

Please do not resort to poison. I understand as a last resort if an animal has attacked or shown interest in humans, but it is very risky. Too many animals: dogs, cats, even young kids, will/can get to the poison and may eat it. Plus, there is no guarantee a coyote will actually eat it. IMO shooting is the most humane way if you have come to the conclusion that removing the predator will help your flock or at least relieve the pressure. I won't voice my opinion on "getting revenge," I don't want a debate. Anyway I hope for the best for you and your flock. Good luck!
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