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how to run temporary electricity to a coop

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

our coop is about 250 feet from the house, it is a temporary place until spring.  we would like to run electricity down there for 2 lights.  what is the cheapest way, knowing its a temp solution, to do this while being safe?  we free range the chickens most of the time, so i need to make sure they wont peck at wiring laying out.

post #2 of 6

The cheapest, safest and easiest may be solar.

The only other way is to run extension cords intended for temporary outdoor use made of SO cord. That would require 250 feet of cord and that could run as much as $60 or more.

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/12PCS-LEDs-Outdoor-Indoor-Solar-Power-Lighting-Light-Lamp-Bulb-Solar-Panel-1-5W-Low-power/2036523926.html


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 10/31/15 at 5:22am

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #3 of 6

I would go solar too. Extension cords would be very expensive to get the proper gauge / thickness to go 250 feet. Please do not simply connect 5 regular 50' cords. They aren't designed to carry a load more than 50 feet. At best you will end up with too little voltage at the end (brown out), at worst the cords could overheat and cause a fire.

 

If this is just temporary but the permanent solution is 250 feet as well, buy the conduit and proper gauge cable and use it on the surface. Then you can properly bury it in the spring. Conduit is cheap - $50 for 250'. The cable will be pricey - you need 8 gauge, 10 might work if you only are using it for lights. A quick check at Home Depot shows $115 for 10 gauge and $175 for 8 gauge.

post #4 of 6

Yep, 10.2 or 12.2 if you are running heat - that gives you the capability of 20 amps with 12. 2 and 30 amps for the 10.  14.2 will give you 15 amps, fine for lighting, etc.  Voltage will drop with a 250 ft run, so thomasboyle is spot on.....10.2 is your best bet even with the long run.  8 gives you 40 amps, which ends with the drop of giving you 30 amp capability. 


Edited by Blooie - 10/31/15 at 5:43pm
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Next year we will have a different building much closer to an elec source. How much sun do I need for the solar to work? Coop I near the woods. Also any links to solar setups? What I typically used?
post #6 of 6

Another easy choice is a rechargeable LED lantern. I use one that goes 60 hours between charges. Plus you can use it for camping, power outages etc. I have power in my coop, but the lights are all on timers, so I don't like to turn them on if they have already gone off for the night. So I use my rechargeable LED lantern for my night time closing of the coop.

 

You don't say where you live, but you may want a good rechargeable spot light too. I would not go out at night and walk 250 feet to the woods where I live without one. Too many bears, bobcat, coyotes etc!

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