BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › Welsummer rooster's comb tuning orange
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Welsummer rooster's comb tuning orange

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

My beautiful 6-month old Welsummer rooster had a dark red comb up until about two weeks ago. Now it is still standing beautifully but it is turning an orangish color.

 

Does anyone know what might be causing this? Is it a problem?

 

Thanks for your help. I'd hate to lose this bird.

post #2 of 8
If you have pictures could you post them it might be easier to tell what's causing it. Are you giving him anything that is orange maybe a carrot? If he is eating to much of something that is orange it might turn his comb orange.
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Good idea. I'll try to get a picture in the next day or two and post it.

 

Thanks

post #4 of 8

A before and after pic would help.

 

Is he eating, drinking, pooping and as active as usual?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 


He seems lethargic and is not his usual feisty, crowing self. His tail feathers are drooping.  

post #6 of 8

Why don't you answer these questions.....  and I'll ask to that this moved to the health forum.

 

1) What type of bird , age and weight (does the chicken seem or feel lighter or thinner than the others.)
2) What is the behavior, exactly.
3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms?
4) Are other birds exhibiting the same symptoms?
5) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma.
6) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation.
7) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all.
8) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc.
9) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?
10 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet?
11) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.
12) Describe the housing/bedding in use
 

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Here are the answers I can provide, aart.

 

1. Welsummer rooster, 6 months old, I have no idea about his weight. He looks about the same size as the hens who were in his age group except he's taller.

 

2. He seems lethargic. Normally he would be very active and run to me when I come out of the house (looking for treats with his girls). He does free range in the yard but he seems slower than he was than he was a week or two ago. He used to crow all the time but now he rarely crows--but he does still have a hearty crow.

 

3. I noticed it about two weeks ago, but that was when I had already been distracted by dealing with a serious illness in our family, so I may have missed the first symptoms.

 

4. No other birds are exhibiting those symptoms. He has three hens and six pullets in his harem.

 

5. No bleeding, injury, or trauma that I can see; although, I have not examined him closely.

 

6. I have no idea what may have caused this.

 

7. He has been free ranging and picking in the grass and dirt but I have not had time to watch him very much so have not seen what he's eaten. He gets the same feed as the girls.

 

8. Have not been able to observe his poop as I work full time and have had too much going on to take time to observe, due to recent events.

 

9. No treatment yet. Did not want to do anything until I had an idea of what the problem might be.

 

10. The last time I took a bird to the vet it cost me $300, and she died anyway. It will be home treatment or no treatment for this bird.

 

11. No pics.

 

12. large, weatherproof coop with no direct wind on the birds but with good cross ventilation. The birds sleep on a roost (all on the top bar). The coop floor is deep pine shavings.

 

I hope this helps.

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

I never got an answer from aart, but I'm happy to report that Stewart the Welsummer cockerel is back to his normal self. I have no idea what his problem was and how he recovered, but it's a pleasure to hear him crow the sun up every day now.

 

His comb is still orange, but he is very active and spunky again. And noisy. LOL

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › Welsummer rooster's comb tuning orange