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Muddy feet! - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksguy View Post
 

I think a huge factor to be considered about wood chips is your climate. In a climate that sees a low relative humidity between rainfall, the chips can dry out and mold will not be able to set in. In a more warm, humid climate - such as what we see around here (NE Kansas), mold is a certainty. We keep wood mulch in our flower beds out front, and it's only 2-3" deep. Guaranteed every year when I rake it up to replace it, down about 1.5" we'll have white mold. I can't imagine the moldy mess I'd have if I kept 8-10" of wood chips anywhere around here. 

 

Personally, I'd never use deep litter wood chips in the run for that very reason - especially not a covered run that gets minimal sunlight to contribute to drying. But, if it works for somebody else, I won't argue with them. 

 

In my climate, I'd use coarse construction sand. It won't dry all the way through, but it also won't mold. 

 

Interesting...

 

Is that white mold you see identified as Aspergillus fungus, or another type considered harmful?

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

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Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonP View Post
 

 

Interesting...

 

Is that white mold you see identified as Aspergillus fungus, or another type considered harmful?

 

Couldn't tell you. I'm not a mycologist nor have I sent the stuff to a lab. I'll tell you this, though - I'm not about to snort a line of the stuff or eat it on a sandwich. The only mold I'm OK with comes on high quality cheese.

post #13 of 15
Organic materiel (if you are concerned about wood chips use hay, straw, leaf litter, lawn cliipings, shavings, etc) in a nice deep layer.
Where are we going, and why are we in this hand basket?
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Where are we going, and why are we in this hand basket?
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post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksguy View Post
 

 

Couldn't tell you. I'm not a mycologist nor have I sent the stuff to a lab. I'll tell you this, though - I'm not about to snort a line of the stuff or eat it on a sandwich. The only mold I'm OK with comes on high quality cheese.

 

Yea, good point.

 

There are many beneficial "molds" or fungi in compost for a flock including mycorrhizal fungi.

 

This is largely determined by the type of organic matter you are composting.

 

That's why I ask...

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Just dropping back in to let you know, I out sand in the coop and it does seem to help.  But the silly birds are a little scared of it!  They are getting better about walking on it now that some time has passed.

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