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Up state Ny winters coops in winter too heat or not too heat?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I know there is lots of reading on this witch I have done my fair share on but can't make up my mind like the title says I live in upstate ny winters can get very cold my coop is very old not insulated and by the time winter comes it should at least be mostly draft free with the use of tar papper now I do have power in the coop so that is not a problem in if all goes too plan it will be tied into the generac back up power system we are having installed for the house over the next few days so I was planning on at least heating there water so we don't have too change it as much do too icing but now my ? Is do I need too heat the coop with a :/lamp or no I know chickens have been around before power and can survive but would it be better too heat them a little maybe on the negative nights or just let them do there thing too help prevent sickness maybe??? And what if eggs freeze are they no good? Would it be better too heat over nest box too keep eggs warm? Or again let nature do its thing? I'm so confused on this topic would love some help:/
post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomercide View Post
 Is do I need too heat the coop with a :/lamp what if eggs freeze are they no good? Yes eggs are still good (maybe not the best for sunny side up for breakfast.) Would it be better too heat over nest box too keep eggs warm?
Collecting eggs more frequently is one remedy or you may employ or something like this in your nest boxes it thermostatically controlled to come on at just above the freezing temperature. You would have to wrap it to suit your particular application if it is viable for your set up. It is available at Home Depot in Canada
images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTIWZ15vQq3E__a9vDJtkv63yGRtKa_z778gZzjlC0PmU6Y8t0CHg

 

 

 

 

Picture of blustery day outside the loft (baby barn) on December 28th 2012.

 

 

I am subject to -40º weather l live in Canada think North Pole. I have 65 trips around the sun and have been keeping chickens and birds for decades.

 

Your best practice I find is to not be too concerned about winterizing or heating your coop to help your birds combat the cold.

 

       Predator proofing "ABSOLUTELY".

 

Your efforts should be spent in winterizing your birds and letting them acclimatize to their surroundings.

This is done by feeding them whole corn if available or cracked corn as an added supplement in a separate feeder.

 

The extra protein is more the adequate to bring them through the                          

                      "COLDEST" winter.

 

Do keep an eye open for birds that maybe not be adapting well to the new menu and may be at the lower end of the pecking order they can sometimes run into problems and may need extra TLC.

 

That being said in a perfect world the flock will flourish and do just fine .

 

I do not add any extra heat or lighting.

Egg production does slack off but I have more than enough eggs for the table all winter long (24 hens).

 

Some people may disagree with my method but it has worked well for me and I am not about to change.

 

I look at it in the same light as winterizing your car.

 

You really do

 

                           "NOT"

 

 

have to winterize your car if you can keep it in a controlled environment at all times otherwise you are in for

 

                         "MAJOR" problem


Edited by Hokum Coco - 11/4/15 at 11:36am

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hum that's good too know I'm glad too read a first hand experience on your birds in the winter predator proofing I got that covered my old pen is built too keep them out every thing double latched solid plywood floors it's sound I would like too think if some thing dose get in at this time we'll they were going too get in ether way… I think I will take your advise and not heat the coop and my other half is laid off in the winter so she can check for eggs while I work (maybe) lol your post has helped me put my mind too ease a little for sure
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
I hear a lot about roost size I have roost bords that are 2x2 are they going too be big enough for the chickens too cover there feet? And another thing I hear is about vents my coop is about 100 years old it's been a chicken coop all that time from my adopted grandma from when she was a kid there is no vents in the roof at all and no insulation in the coop? Where the roof joist are the kinda even border that up were it meets the walls it's not super tight can see light threw most of it think it was more done for critters but is this going too be on I hear a lot about moister building up and making frost bite.... But part of me says those old timers must of known what they were doing but another power says some one along the way altered it maybe but I don't see any vents of were they would of been just one large window panel I can take in and out plus the 2 run doors I have too open any suggestions on what too do?? Do I run the coop as is or so I try altering it? I mean how much venting is needed is the few gaps it has enough
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