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Miserable start to having backyard chickens - Page 4

post #31 of 34
@shortgrass, this is the best one I could find:
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/85030426/anthelmintic-efficacy-pumpkin-seed-cucurbita-pepo-linnaeus-1753-ostrich-gastrointestinal-nematodes-semiarid-region-para-ba-state-brazil

-Kathy
post #32 of 34

Hey thanks Kathy! Your research and my annoying persistence lol; we could team up wink.png

I apologize, @CHICKENTIKKA82, I have a really annoying habit of derailing threads lol wink.png I hope you got some useful tips out of it, other members had great suggestions smile.png

I find it intriguing, how everyone differs in their beliefs, methods, and practices, but we can all agree that one thing takes precedence; our care for our animals.

I think, sometimes, we stress too much about too little. Having animals should be an enjoyable experience, not stressful. I'm guilty of "loving" things to death; ie, I've over watered and overfed and killed plants, I've killed kittens over medicating, I've been guilty of guessing wrong and losing animals because of bad decisions, and poor genetics, etc. It stinks.

But I've also found myself looking up what the spots on a comb could be and it ranged from scabs to death... Lol I freaked myself out thinking contagious disease and it was literally a scab from a peck. I panicked and culled a hen because of a scab. sad.png

The point of that was; relax, they're birds. Yes, some of us have pets, some have livestock, and some (me) have livestock that I am very fond of, my pets that I eat ha-ha; I had to at some point relax, stop scaring myself, and trust that these birds are a lot tougher than we think. Meds aren't necessary unless they are actually sick, and dusting and pest control isn't needed unless there are actually pests...

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in my book. Cleanliness, fresh water, good nutrition, healthy birds that are almost care free wink.png Relaxing and enjoyable, like it should be! smile.png
Edited by shortgrass - 11/8/15 at 6:21am
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortgrass View Post

Just to avoid any known toxins lol... Mites and lice can be deterred and elimi ated with numerous natural or organic methods, so it takes all the question out of "am I going to eat Front line or Permethrin eggs?" big_smile.png

Neem oil, Rosemary oil, eucalyptus... All great deterrents, and Neem oil will disrupt horomones of pests so they can't reproduce or eat, so they die Coconut oil on legs will smother and repel, and nice soft legs to boot wink.pngbig_smile.png

You can also just use natural pyrethrum, instead of chemical permethrin; its much safer and no worries about withdrawal times or exposure to chemical residues smile.png
I have a gigantic rosemary bush,and I cut sprigs and entwine them in the wire of the coop, put them in the rafters inside the coop and just about anywhere I can. You can also strip the stems and throw the rosemary in their nests. It also deters flies. Once the sprig dries out, I simply remove and replace. I use D3 but extremely sparingly. I put it in the nest boxes maybe once a month,but only maybe 1/8 tsp if that each (not that I measure it out, but guessing about that much). And if flies are bad in the farmyard area, the ground gets a very light sprinkling,too, including my coop floor. I put a tiny bit in each dust bath for both the chickens and quail. I've never had mite problems and all birds are very healthy. Bc we get bad fly problems here, we spray with Pemethrin but we never ever spray or put anything directly on our birds' bodies. Wishing you the best with your new birds and hope them feel better and overcome whatever is making them sick.
post #34 of 34
Thread Starter 
Well a big thank you to everyone who contributed to this thread with lots of information, tips and tricks that have really helped. As a result I have removed the majority of the wood shavings leaving on some in the nesting boxes. I have removed the DE and have started to use essential oils instead to deter pests. I have added extra ventilation to the coop to ensure a high up flow of air preventing and stale air and have confined to clean the coop on a daily basis to prevent any ammonia build ups. I have been using some vitamin supplements in the water and continued to allow the birds to free range for grass and bugs in the day with a supply of layers pellets on hand 24/7. As the weather is getting cooler I have started to add a little mixed corn in the evening as a treat with some meal worms for warmth and an extra bit of protein.

The girls are fit and healthy, glossy feathers, bright eyes and look super clean and happy. They have a great appetite and there is no sign of coughing or sneezing or weird lethargic behaviour.

Good times!!

Thanks guys .
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