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Are there any winter crops that can be started now for chickens (in Northern California)

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Just curious if there are are any good winter crops that can be started now for chickens (in Northern California)?

I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
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I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
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post #2 of 8
Idk.. maybe others will. . I've never grew for chickens. .just gave them my garden scraps..
I have heard of seed sprouting in plats for chickens.. I suspect that can grown all year.. may need some kind of greenhouse . All alot people swear by fermenting feed too.. have you tried searching for the answer on byc
post #3 of 8

Winter peas, radish, 7top or other forage type turnip, alfalfa, oats, barley, wheat.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenCanoe View Post
 

Winter peas, radish, 7top or other forage type turnip, alfalfa, oats, barley, wheat.

 

Great! Thank you!

I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
Reply
I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
Reply
post #5 of 8

Kale is fairly tough and depending on your winter temperatures, broccoli (feed the leaves), cauliflowers (feed the leaves), cabbage can be grown in the colder months.

 

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

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“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumi View Post
 

Kale is fairly tough and depending on your winter temperatures, broccoli (feed the leaves), cauliflowers (feed the leaves), cabbage can be grown in the colder months.

 

 Thank you!

 

I've had some luck with Kale in a very protected area. We have Sacramento summers- hot/ dry, low humidity, little rain (drought for 10 years.). But, in winter we get down into the 20's, frost every morning, and some years snow for a day or so. Last year, the Kale, broccoli, and cauliflowers froze completely out.

I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
Reply
I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
Reply
post #7 of 8

When I lived in South Africa we grew the above during winter, along with peas and broad beans. Those were our "winter veg". Snow though… whee… that puts a different spin on things. You should ask in our sister forum, TheEasyGarden.com, and see what the members over there suggest for growing as well as cold protection for the extremes. 

 

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

Reply

 

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

Reply
post #8 of 8

I'm surprised the cabbage, broccoli and kale freeze out there. You could mulch them or use a floating row cover. Brussels sprouts are more cold hardy.

 

http://www.dripworks.com/category/agribon-rowcover?gclid=CjwKEAiAgvyxBRDmuviAj67g-XQSJABTLMcH5W1nOIvyEHqVHKUN3_3mSedw8YDHvn26SZIsptgODhoCkSHw_wcB

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
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