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Egg laying for first time

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Three of my girls are of egg laying age and are showing all the basic signs of being ready (comb and waffles are getting red, squat when you approach and pet them). My question is how do I know if they payed their first egg if they are not in their hen house??

(My girls free range through your my backyard almost all day. Usually 11-12 till it gets dark and they go in the hen house on their own, I check on them from time to time to make sure all are ok and bring them
Treats here and there) if one of them is ready to lay the first egg and they are not in the house is there a way for me to know or am I gonna be doing an egg hunt daily??
post #2 of 7

Every day will be like an Easter egg hunt.  Good luck for those first eggs - hopefully in the hen house.

Friends are the family you make for yourself.
There are no coincidences- only providences.
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Friends are the family you make for yourself.
There are no coincidences- only providences.
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Well low and behold I go to check on the girls to make sure all are in the house for the night, freshen their water and food and what do I find on the hen house floor???? Our first egg
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Now I just have to figure out who layed it. Three were "squatting" the last few days when I pet them, one didn't do that today...could that be her?
post #5 of 7

Might be a good idea to keep them confined to coop and run until they get in the habit if using the nests.

Some fake eggs/golf balls in some of the nests can help.

 

 

Signs of onset of lay---I've found the pelvic points to be the most accurate.

Squatting:

If you touch their back they will hunker down on the ground, then shake their tail feathers when they get back up.

This shows they are sexually mature and egg laying is close at hand.

 

Combs and Wattles:

Plump, shiny red - usually means laying.

Shriveled, dryish looking and pale - usually means not laying.

Tho I have found that the combs and wattles can look full and red one minute then pale back out the next due to exertion or excitement, can drive ya nuts when waiting for a pullet to lay!

 

2 bony points(pelvic bones) on either side of vent:

Less than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means not laying.

More than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means laying.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
I have 3 that show the signs of laying, so just need to figure which of the three laid the first egg
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by zekintha View Post

I have 3 that show the signs of laying, so just need to figure which of the three laid the first egg

Feel the pelvic points, it may be obvious.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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