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Advice on a new rooster

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thinking about adding a cockerel to my flock of different breeds...I have 6 hens. GLW,SLW,BA,2BO,BJG. Any suggestions?
post #2 of 8

Start looking around, try to get a rooster that is close to a year old, by then their temperament is pretty established, and they are mature enough to handle ALL the aspects of being a flock master. Like wise, don't get a rooster until your hens are laying. 

 

If this is your first time with a rooster, do not make a pet of him, make him move out of your way. Don't let him breed in front of you or crow when you are close by. A firm push will be enough. 

 

 

This will change the dynamics of the flock, the girls will fall in love with the rooster, and pay him all the attention that they currently pay you. He will come over to meet you at the gate, and generally, kind of, sort of, keep himself between you and the flock. I like having a rooster in the flock, but it does change things.

 

After disposition, age, then go for eye candy. Ask around at the feed store, or the local poultry group, for other people that raise chickens, often times they will have a sweetheart, that should have been culled but was so nice, that so far he has been spared. And THAT is the one your want!

 

Good luck.

Mrs K

Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your advice Mrs. K.
I think I will start looking and keep your advice in mind.
post #4 of 8

Agrees with everything Mrs.K said.... except the interfering with mating and crowing, I don't think that's necessary.

There's lots of different techniques in dealing with keeping a cockbird.

 

Definitely best to get an older one that is well behaved but an 'extra' that someone would rather re-home than eat.

My first flock of adults contained such a boy, and I passed him on when I was done instead of eating him.

 

1 cockbird for 6 hens might result in over-breeding...or it might not.

1:10 ratio is recommended in a commercial facility for fertility percentage but many breeders use pairs, trios, quads. 

Always be prepared to separate a misbehaving male away from the flock.

 

Always like to ask, why do you want a cockbird?

Hatching? Be ready to deal with all the males that come from hatching.

Flock protection? Not always effective, often the first to get eaten.

Eye candy? Well, yeah!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
The hubs and I were talking about that last night. We went on co to see what was available.
I have always wanted lavender orps, and found some one on CL willing to sell a pair.
We were thinking about putting the pair with my 2 BO pullets. Any thoughts on that?
Idk being new to raising chickens, and winter just around the corner. This would be my first winter caring for them and I'm not sure what challenges lay ahead for me.
post #6 of 8

Integration can be tricky...adult cockbird is usually the easiest integration.

 

Getting thru you r first winter can be trying, might be better to wait until spring.

Here's some good reading on integration, read that.... then decide.

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/adding-to-your-flock

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Good information. Thank you. Now, how do I save it?
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmdarrow View Post

Good information. Thank you. Now, how do I save it?

I have the link copied and pasted into my notes in a Word document.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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