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I'm conflicted about my roo, advice welcome - Page 2

post #11 of 17
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Originally Posted by tess36 View Post

Thank you all for responding. I have been letting him know who the 'Boss' is (mainly from researching threads here), but I guess I hadn't been bothering lately and with his hormones going into overdrive, it was the perfect setup for an 'incident'.

I guess we'll see how it goes over the next few months, while ensuring the boys are not around him. If he isn't more trustworthy (I use that term loosely) by spring, he will have to go.

On that note, if he has to go...
I know that temperament is largely bird dependent vs breed dependent, but there are also generalizations. Are there any breeds that are known for being more laid back compared to others. I really had wanted to get a Blue Laced Red Wyandotte roo before I discovered that my Polish was a roo. Are they more laid back than Polish? Is the true prudent choice to just hold off on a rooster until my boys are a few years older and better able to assert their own dominance when faced with a frisky roo?

Thank you again to all the responses!

For the best chance of getting a friendly roo, I'd recommend a Brahma, Cochin, or Silkie. Orpingtons are great as well. I would especially look into Brahmas. Never met a mean one. If you can find one, oriental gamefowl cocks are marvelous and manfighters of those breeds are almost unheard of. Their only con is that you cannot keep multiple roosters, as while they are extremely friendly towards humans, they are still bred to fight each other, often to the death. I'd also go to a breeder to acquire a cockerel, as generalizations are far more accurate with breeder stock.

Wyandottes have average temperaments. Never personally had a mean roo but the most vicious hen I've ever had was a GLW. Worse than any roo I've laid eyes on. Also had one GLW roo who would attempt to mount my shoes when I stepped into the pen. Silly boy.

You'll want to avoid Rhode Islands in addition to the Polish
Edited by QueenMisha - 11/9/15 at 10:57am

200 something birds. 8 species. ♥ Norman ♥ Norma ♥ Misha ♥ and ♥ Taylor ♥ are my babies.
Visit Norman the Rooster's Thread Here!
Breeding Sex Linked Silkies, Gamefowl, and EEs/OEs. Amateur genetics buff. Caponization practitioner/advocate.
Working at The Poultry Palace in Placerville, CA. Come see us for started pullets, chicks, Bar Ale feed, & more!

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200 something birds. 8 species. ♥ Norman ♥ Norma ♥ Misha ♥ and ♥ Taylor ♥ are my babies.
Visit Norman the Rooster's Thread Here!
Breeding Sex Linked Silkies, Gamefowl, and EEs/OEs. Amateur genetics buff. Caponization practitioner/advocate.
Working at The Poultry Palace in Placerville, CA. Come see us for started pullets, chicks, Bar Ale feed, & more!

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post #12 of 17

Mine settled down as he aged and I used some of the training techniques fairly successfully. However, he seemingly cannot recognize me if I wear anything but farm boots or clogs. Different clothing or footwear, and he regards me as an intruder. But carrying an old broom sends him scurrying, as he has had his behind thumped with it a few times. I'd be extremely cautious with a young child. Perhaps a run for your roo?

EEs, BRs, Blue Andalusians, Exchequer Leghorns, Cream Legbar, Dominique, Partridge Penedesenca, Welsumer, Columbian Wyandotte
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EEs, BRs, Blue Andalusians, Exchequer Leghorns, Cream Legbar, Dominique, Partridge Penedesenca, Welsumer, Columbian Wyandotte
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post #13 of 17


On that note, if he has to go...
I know that temperament is largely bird dependent vs breed dependent, but there are also generalizations. Are there any breeds that are known for being more laid back compared to others. I really had wanted to get a Blue Laced Red Wyandotte roo before I discovered that my Polish was a roo. Are they more laid back than Polish? Is the true prudent choice to just hold off on a rooster until my boys are a few years older and better able to assert their own dominance when faced with a frisky roo?

Thank you again to all the responses!

   Some breeds have a reputation for aggressive roosters.  Among the other breeds I think to a certain extent it can be how the rooster is raised.  I think the best ones are hen raised or raised within a flock so they don't start at the top.  They Have to come up through the ranks so to speak.  If you have a young cockerel and can put him in with adult hens or he's with his mother and other adults in the flock you have a better chance of good temperament.

      Of my two flock roosters, when one started lording it over the young pullets he was with, I threw him in with my laying hens.

       The other, my favorite is a real sweetheart.  He was a singleton so when the weather was getting cold I threw him in with the flock when he was only about seven weeks old and he was at the bottom of the pecking order.  Now he is big gorgeous and friendly.  He minds his own and the flock's business and is fine with the dogs and other animals and most important, with people


Edited by dekel18042 - 11/9/15 at 7:43pm
post #14 of 17
I never have people aggressive roosters, not sure why so many other people do, I did have a white crested polish that we culled because he was horrible with the hens and were over mating, I found him to be a poor rooster, I always keep multiple roosters and the only ones I ever had any trouble was from one I handled a lot, though his brother was fine, I don't think it's so much a breed thing as it's a breeding and rearing thing.

When my young roosters start making the hens scream I chase them off, and eventually they get rounded up and put in rooster jail where they continue to be terrified by me just from feeding them, I do think it helps to have older well mannered roosters to also chase the young ones.

I would round yours up and pen him separately within the coop for a while, letting him out occasionally and then using a net to round him back up, eventually he will run cackling whenever he sees you without turning it into a contest, you will dominate him through this process. I don't try to judge them until they are a year old by then they are mature and aren't going to change.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #15 of 17
My best roo so far has been a Red Star. I regret giving him to my aunt; he's such a good boy for her that I want him back! But I have 2 younger ones I wanted for breeding, but Big Bird(the red Star) was my big man. I don't know if it was the breed, or the fact that my kids handled him so much, but he never once even gestured to me, always respected me and the kids, and was absolutely the most protective roo I've ever had; very alert and intelligent.

I had the worst roo in a banty Cochin. Surprisingly the biggest jerk I've ever seen lol; his brother and he both ended up in deep freeze camp by just 16 weeks, they were so darn nasty!

I think all breeds have potential to be good OR bad, just depends on the individual birds "wiring" and how they bond to you as chicks. smile.png

Edit* oh and training, training is a must, IMO
Edited by shortgrass - 11/10/15 at 12:11am
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
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http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #16 of 17
So far all of my roosters have been so friendly and mellow. I thought maybe the whole "attacking rooster" thing was just a myth. Or maybe just something that happened to non-animal people who ran and screamed just because they were scared of chickens. I work with animals professionally and if they attack out of fear or confusion I am as loving and patient as possible, but if they attack out of anger or dominance there is absolutely no hesitation on my part to set things straight. What breeds are known for this? I have orpingtons and leghorns and the roos are so sweet and respectful.

The only thing I have ever noticed my roosters doing is occasionally one will stop right in front of me when I'm walking (I think trying to make me walk around him). I just step right on him or kick him (not hard) and that's the end of that. Hahaha.
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for your input. I'm sorry I didn't come back right away as I work night shift and frequently 'lose' a few days intermittently! 😉

I think he made my mind up for me yesterday. I had gone to the coop to check for eggs (got my first eggs Tuesday {yeah!}) and was walking back to the house. He had followed the girls to the run where they had followed me, but had stayed behind when I left, whereas the hens were mostly all following me back to towards the house. The last time I glanced back he was not in sight. I got about forty feet away and I got my left leg flogged from behind and I felt him peck my left foot, before I even turned, he took off at a run. I perceive this as an unprovoked attack. He had to cover about forty feet *in a hurry* with the apparent sole purpose of attacking me, then ran off.

I described this and some previously noted behavior of his to some other long time chicken owners, such as going on roost first and leaving all his girls out in the yard, still milling about as darkness fell, repeatedly. They were both of the opinion that he just didn't sound like a good roo and voted he needed to go too.

So, again, thank you all again for your input. It is much appreciated. I've started a new thread in what I'm considering for this upcoming spring.
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