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Temperature question

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I was wondering if there is a temperature that I should close the little door from our chickens house to their run.  We are in NC and it hasn't really gotten cold here yet. Their whole house run set up is fairly small and we have made it predator proof. We leave the little sliding door from their house to their run open all the time so they can just go in and out as they please but with the cooler weather arriving I want to make sure the girls aren't cold at night.  I was thinking I should shut the door if the temps drop below 40 degrees.  Does that sound right or should I close it at higher or lower temps?  Thanks!  

post #2 of 16

I close ours when it's about 15 below zero. Your chickens will be just fine if you leave it open. Fresh air is good!


Edited by bobbi-j - 11/9/15 at 3:24pm

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #3 of 16

You should have enough ventilation in the coop so that the temps inside pretty much match the temps outside....

...whether the door is open or not.

 

Just need to protect the roost area from drafts strong enough to literally ruffle feathers.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 16

:welcome

 

I agree to just leave it open. Temps in your state aren't going to get extreme enough to worry about the cold. I know it may seem cold to you, but remember folks raise birds in Montana and do just fine--lots colder than your area.

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies.  So how cold to worry about drafts?  My hubby wants to build some frames with clear plastic to put up along the sides of the run when we go out of town since we can't close the door when we are away.  Can they handle drafts in the 30s?  Here is a pic of our coop so you have an idea about its size.

post #6 of 16

Chickens not only can handle drafts in the 30s, many chickens in the northern climates are still out running around pecking, scratching and doing chickeny things in the 30s and far below that. I think it's most important not to have drafts that are strong enough to ruffle their feathers blowing directly on the roost area. It's getting into the 30s here at night, (actually into the mid-20s tonight) and I haven't even put the windows in my coop yet. 

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #7 of 16

I have tarps on some of the run walls. The tarps are covering the walls that face the strong winds in the winter, after the winter is over, I take them off for ventilation in the summer

 

I leave the hen door open in the coop 24/7 and have an automatic door in the run that lets them in and out into their fenced area

loving my flock with their personalities, getting to know them and enjoy everyday I spend with them
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loving my flock with their personalities, getting to know them and enjoy everyday I spend with them
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post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by callieriggs View Post
 

Thanks for the replies.  So how cold to worry about drafts?  My hubby wants to build some frames with clear plastic to put up along the sides of the run when we go out of town since we can't close the door when we are away.  Can they handle drafts in the 30s?  Here is a pic of our coop so you have an idea about its size.

Will be tricky to have enough ventilation without drafts in a coop that small.....

just make sure the openings are not facing the prevailing winds and check for any condensation on the inside walls.

You could put some wind blocks on the lower run portion but leave a gap at the tops of the run walls for ventilation.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #9 of 16

I think something along the run walls would be fine, but I'd go more for a wind or rain break than something to keep them warm. Aart's suggestion of doing the bottom few feet and leaving the top open is great. Animals really, really need fresh air to thrive.

 

This year I'm using breeding pens that are coop-less. It's basically tarps on a cattle panel frame. I wouldn't think our climates are that different temperature wise. My main coop is a large walk in, it's  a converted green house. We've opened enough windows, etc the temp inside is always the same as the outdoor temp. I've kept birds in that coop for 10 years with no issues.

 

As long as the birds are dry and have shelter from wind blowing directly on them, they can easily handle temps below zero.

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #10 of 16
People further south than North Carolina have caused frostbite by locking their chickens up tight. People a lot further north than North Carolina have solved frostbite problems by providing more ventilation. The problem is that moisture from their breathing, their poop, and from a waterer increases moisture levels which can cause frostbite. So you want enough ventilation to get rid of excess moisture.

Wind chill is a real phenomenon plus their feathers insulate them by trapping tiny pockets of air. If a breeze strong enough to let those air pockets out they can get cold. When we say drafts, we are not talking about a real gentle movement of air like you get around a window in your house, we’re talking about a breeze that ruffles feathers. A gentle draft moves air and helps get rid of excess moisture.

I also like Aart’s suggestion.

Maybe this will help. I took this when the outside temperature was 4 degrees above zero Fahrenheit. The wind was not blowing so they came out to enjoy the weather. If the wind was blowing at that temperature they’d be in side or in some protected spot.


When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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