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Chickens not laying

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

My chickens have cut way back on laying eggs.  I introducted a rooster to the group this spring and he is now fully mature.  Would this have anything to do with their recent lack of production?  I had one brooding and I think I have one that's eating the eggs, but others seem to have stopped.  Any thoughts?

 

thanks.


Edited by Space Cat - 11/9/15 at 2:43pm
post #2 of 7

This is the time of year that birds molt.  How old are they?  They generally cannot lay eggs and replace feathers, all of their energy goes into replacing feathers.  Some molting birds can lose a lot of weight, so after they get their feathers back in, they have to get their body weight back up before they can resume laying.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

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Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

Reply
post #3 of 7

What are you feeding?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

They've been on a organic layers mash since forever.  I've had bought two adult birds last year, (who may have been older than was advertised), plus 3 newbies...   Then introduced 3 babies this spring, plus a baby rooster.  Laying has trickled off even after molting.  They have adequate space, places to roost and nest, look healthy.   I'm going to set up a camera and see if I can pick up any clues.

 

thanks.

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Chooks View Post
 

This is the time of year that birds molt.  How old are they?  They generally cannot lay eggs and replace feathers, all of their energy goes into replacing feathers.  Some molting birds can lose a lot of weight, so after they get their feathers back in, they have to get their body weight back up before they can resume laying.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

Reply

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

Reply
post #6 of 7

Another factor is the shorter days. Hens laying production is directly related to the amount of light. Fourteen hours is what will help to produce the most eggs, I believe. Some chicken keepers will put supplemental lighting in the coop to promote egg production. You can find lots of information on this site (http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/403343/supplemental-light-for-winter-laying).

"Never let a problem to be solved become more important than a person to be loved." -Thomas S. Monson
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"Never let a problem to be solved become more important than a person to be loved." -Thomas S. Monson
Reply
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Chooks View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Chooks View Post
 

This is the time of year that birds molt.  How old are they?  They generally cannot lay eggs and replace feathers, all of their energy goes into replacing feathers.  Some molting birds can lose a lot of weight, so after they get their feathers back in, they have to get their body weight back up before they can resume laying.

Ditto Dat^^^

 

They could probably use a boost in protein.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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