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Hen not accepting rooster

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I recently embarked on my backyard chicken adventure. I didn't want any roosters, but thanks to the local farm store I ended up with 5 and 10 hens. I culled 2 roos early on BC they were very aggressive and fighting. There was peace for a time. Then last wk the fighting stated again. I had bo, rir, and Ameracana rooster left. I kept the am, and culled others. And then finally I got my first eggs and there was peace again. 2 days after culling tho, one of my buffs stated behaving oddly. She will have nothing to do with the rooster and he tries so hard. She goes ballistic when he even gets near her. She won't come out of the coop in the morning with the rest. I have to do in and feed her separately and then let her out away from the rest. I even tried taking just her and the roo out today by themselves for a while. I held her and squatted down on ground. He picked a weed and danced all around but she was not having any part of it. What do I do? It's been nearly a wk now. I'm worried about her, and of course this is messing up the flock order.
Edited by PattyJoBecker - 11/9/15 at 2:48pm
post #2 of 7
Not much you can do but let her get used to him, she probably was under the protection of one of the other roosters and isn't comfortable with him. Give her time and don't force it.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

Not much you can do but let her get used to him, she probably was under the protection of one of the other roosters and isn't comfortable with him. Give her time and don't force it.


I agree. Young roos do not necessarily have the greatest powers of seduction, but its likely that she will come round to him in the end.

Nairobi, Kenya
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Nairobi, Kenya
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post #4 of 7

My pullets didn't take kindly to my cockerel trying to mount them at first, most of them just accept it now. They sure made some noise at first in protest and tried to get away. He was a little rough at first, but he's calmed down with it. Sometimes when they THINK he's going to try to mount they'll move away from him, but he sneaks his way back over and gets some lol

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

Not much you can do but let her get used to him, she probably was under the protection of one of the other roosters and isn't comfortable with him. Give her time and don't force it.

This^^^

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
That really makes sense. I reviewed some videos I'd taken and it did seem she was the fav of the buff I culled. Things are still bad for her. She wants nothing to do with him and he's pretty brutal at trying to get to her tho he's ok with the other hens. He tore her head up pretty bad. Since then I've been keeping them to wear they can see another but not get to each other... If it didn't get better soon I'm going to try to find him a new home. I can't stand seeing her miserable hiding in a corner or getting torn up by him all the time. And it's not fair to him to have to be separated from the flock via a fence all day..
Edited by PattyJoBecker - 11/20/15 at 8:16am
post #7 of 7
It would probably be better to separate her where everyone can see her, but getting rid of him if you don't really want him is better.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
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