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feeding corn and dried wheat seeds as diet - Page 2

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

so barley is malt to right is that good for them?

post #12 of 19

There is no alcohol in spent brew grains. What I was suggesting is to ask at a local brewery for spent grain. You'd likely get it for free.

 

Of grains barley is the most nutritious/digestible. Sprouting grains will increase the protein content. Barely sprouted for 7 days will increase protein by roughly 3 percent. The initial protein content of barely varies by type and region 9-18% so I've no idea what is in Palestine.

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

i have some barley but they wont eat anymore they like soft and moisty stuff can I do this at home as there are no brewers here ?

post #14 of 19

If you don't know how to sprout grain then google it. Add water grain and wait 7 days, let sprout, then feed that.

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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post #15 of 19
You could ferment it. That's what I would do smile.png

I ferment wheat, corn, alfalfa, millet, oats, and BOSS together for about 4 days and feed it to them. You want an airtight bucket with a lid; fill it 1/2 way with the grain, and cover with water and keep the lid on it, opening it daily to let it "breathe". Keep it at about 65 degrees F for best growth, and scoop and feed as needed, replenishing with fresh grain.

It'll be soft and moist, and increase nutrition from the fermenting process.

You can add some greens and veggie scraps for extra vitamins as needed, and don't forget to give them access to oyster shell, as corn and wheat might not have enough calcium for them to lay at optimum.

Best wishes! smile.png
Edited by shortgrass - 11/11/15 at 7:30pm
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
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http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
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post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 

egg head and shortgrass thanks that's what I was trying to say should they sprout a little or 3 inches tall or so and can I leave a hole on the bucket lid for air and also I planted it in the garden 3days ago and they are really about a half an inch tall I just cut the barley grass to give to the hens

post #17 of 19

You can increase the quality and nutrition of the wheat if you sprout it. You can read about Growing Fodder For Chickens in this thread:

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/713334/growing-fodder-for-chickens

 

Basically it's growing mats of wheat grass. All it takes is wheat seeds and water and about 5-7 days to let it grow. Then you can feed it to the chickens.

 

I should add that you do not need soil to grow the mats of wheat grass.


Edited by Free Spirit - 11/11/15 at 8:35pm

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How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

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Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

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You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

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post #18 of 19

When feeding sprouted grain you feed the grain and all not just the plant. Allowing to germinate for a 5-7 days soaked should only be producing the root. Fodder is when you use wire to protect the plant underneath and let them eat the greens growing through. Some folks like to put fodder beds in the run. Fermenting is just what it sounds like, bacterial process converting starch to sugar. That's part of the brewing process too but can be done with feed but access to yeast and bacteria is needed. Some use unfiltered/unpastured cider with the mother to jump start the fermenting process. Once you have a batch going you use some of it as a starter for the next batch.


Edited by Egghead_Jr - 11/12/15 at 3:15am

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenshiha View Post

egg head and shortgrass thanks that's what I was trying to say should they sprout a little or 3 inches tall or so and can I leave a hole on the bucket lid for air and also I planted it in the garden 3days ago and they are really about a half an inch tall I just cut the barley grass to give to the hens

Sounds like you're sprouting big_smile.png You don't have to cut it from the ground; you can pull it up, roots and all, or if you want it to stay growing in the ground like grass, you can sure cut it like grass smile.png

It's confusing lol, fodder is growing the grain, kind of like sprouting greens for salads wink.png Fermenting is what we do to make saurkraut or kimchi, airtight, no sprouting, but bacteria start breaking down the grain so its soft and full of enzymes.

Both are great options, and you'll get more out of your grain either way.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
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