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Feed Questions - Page 3

post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 

Interesting. I got a bit concerned about it all when I read they apply roundup to wheat to push a uniform harvest. It seems to do something so the wheat all ripen at the same time. So I was like.. that is absorbed in the wheat and not sure want that in me after consuming it. As I am aging I am seeing different health issues in me and peers that did not seem to be around in my grandmothers generation, so have been trying to be more aware and spending my money on things that are healthier. But with the lack of  understanding and knowing the labels don't always tell the full truth kinda leave me scratching me head. I am not trying to be an organic egg producer. Just want to raise chickens that produce eggs and the occasional freezer bird. So trying to make healthy choices there too. Organic feed seems double regular and need to know what exactly is the organic.. they don't use pesticides or chemicals? If the chickens eat non-organic then what is in the eggs and meat that may pass on to me and should there be any concerns there? 

post #22 of 24
Here's a thread that you may find interesting wink.png
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

It's pretty much what I'm having to do in order to certify my parents land to go completely organic. There are some fields that are, some halfway there, and some that might not ever make certification. It's a grueling process... I should update the thread; we've done a lot of work this summer wink.png

In short, it takes 3 years of NO CHEMICAL application to a field in order to certify it organic. The you can begin selling the crops, grown organically, as "certified organic". But it can take way more than just 3 years to fix the soil.


That's ORGANIC, fixing the soil so that it's healthy and full of nutrients and defenses, much like the plants and even our bodies. The soil is a huge organism, a VERY crucial organism, and its been damaged almost beyond repair.

But the work is worth it. You can taste it, you can feel it just being better for you... Like a homegrown tomato from the garden just tastes and looks so much better than the carbon copy tasteless tomato at the store. wink.png

@Free Spirit, our trick for borers is prevention. The soil has to be ready for attack in spring, as borers emerge from the soil. We use nematodes to start with, and if we dint call in the right beneficials and do start to see damage, we go straight to Azamax, which is Azadirachtin, from the Neem oil. It's super potent and risk if hurting beneficial predators, so we use it only when necessary, and try to keep it from hitting the soil.

I do use BT, though. It helps control other larvae, especially flies and gnats.... You'd probably like this site smile.png I even left it on "nematodes" big_smile.png

http://www.arbico-organics.com/category/beneficial-nematodes

The last thing I wanted to mention was the alfalfa that gets sold to the dairies.. . ok, the seed was GM seed. Alfalfa reseeds itself, and these fields are mostly 10+ years old... Do the math, if we have used organic practice on those fields for 10+ years, and never reseeded, then those fields are "certifiable" as organic. And the organic hay going to the organic dairy is indeed used to produce "certified" organic milk. NOT non GMO, but organic wink.png
Edited by shortgrass - 11/15/15 at 9:06am
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortgrass View Post
@Free Spirit, our trick for borers is prevention. The soil has to be ready for attack in spring, as borers emerge from the soil. We use nematodes to start with, and if we dint call in the right beneficials and do start to see damage, we go straight to Azamax, which is Azadirachtin, from the Neem oil. It's super potent and risk if hurting beneficial predators, so we use it only when necessary, and try to keep it from hitting the soil.

I do use BT, though. It helps control other larvae, especially flies and gnats.... You'd probably like this site smile.png I even left it on "nematodes" big_smile.png

http://www.arbico-organics.com/category/beneficial-nematodes

Hey, @shortgrass thanks for the tips and the link :D. I haven't planted a garden in a few years - just been too busy or dealing with health issues. Was thinking about getting some Milky Spore as I have an over populated grub problem (and consequentially a mole problem) . Looks like that other stuff would be much better and help with the other pests too (may need all three types). The last garden I planted was the year I had an explosion of grasshoppers (bad drought year) and bought 10 praying mantis egg sacks and hung them all around my 5 acres in hopes they would breed and help with control. Neem Oil became my best friend that year too. I have so many lady bugs they are literally infesting my house, LOL, so I never have an aphid problem, yea!

 

Someday I would like to set up some enclosed and covered chicken runs to go between rows and put the girls to work with weeding and pest control. My garden area is 2500 sq ft.

 

Organic gardening is a never ending learning experience but is so worth the effort.

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherol View Post
 

Organic feed seems double regular and need to know what exactly is the organic.. they don't use pesticides or chemicals? If the chickens eat non-organic then what is in the eggs and meat that may pass on to me and should there be any concerns there? 

As you can see from the discussion here that the answer to your question is not a simple one to answer. The simple answer is that if your trying to be healthy then look for organic labeling and buy organic when and if you can afford to. Grow your own produce if you can and have the space. It is unlikely to be 100% organic 100% of the time. You simply do the best you can and don't worry if it's not perfect. A little bit of trying is better than doing nothing at all. If you only can do 20% organic/80% non organic then you are still 20% better than you were before.

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply
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