BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Meat Birds ETC › Dispatching with head shot. Anyone do it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dispatching with head shot. Anyone do it? - Page 4

post #31 of 35
Thread Starter 

I'll be using the trusty hatchet on the last three culls next week. Will be able to tell if the saddle and wing tip fathers pluck as easy as the pellet pith bird. If not then pithing by pellet will be the preferred method here. It seems some can't wrap minds around 75ft being a non-skilled shot. With the right equipment (scope and bi-pod) there is only patiently waiting for the right shot. Nothing manly or added extra effort to accomplish. If it wasn't raining 50ft would have been the mark but there's no difference in shooting those two distances.

 

The manly thing is to use a blind and take a white tail deer with a .22 pellet via head shot. Now that's bragging rights only by power plant used. The shot if under 150ft not hard with bi-pod and blind. Just a lot of waiting...and waiting...and waiting in the cold and elements for the right one to come along and present itself for the right shot. That's manly.

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply
post #32 of 35

mine had lung cancer and the after effects of radiation leave him very weak and unsteady.  We do what we must.  As long as it's a quick kill, it doesn't really matter how you get it done.

post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by trudyg View Post

mine had lung cancer and the after effects of radiation leave him very weak and unsteady.  We do what we must.  As long as it's a quick kill, it doesn't really matter how you get it done.

True.

I personally think just OWNING a gun is a specific skill lol, just hear me out. wink.png

I used to be a vegetarian PETA gun control anti military freak, even though i had to climb over a shotgun every day just to check cows; I hated shooting things, seriously! big_smile.png

Ok then I grew up... Anyhow, I never owned a gun, never wanted a gun, in fact, I was the jerk that used to drive up and down the roads on the Grand Mesa, honking my horn and scaring the deer away from the hunters.

Yeah, it was horrible wink.png

Fast forward 15 years, I'm hungry, that deer tasted really good that my buddy brought over, maybe hunting isn't so bad.... Ok now I own a gun, and I can shoot big stuff, and my daughter isn't scared like I was and does need "target practice", as I get grumpy when she uses the blue jays at the birdbath for practicing aim....and I can get the tomcat with a pellet to the behind, but I'm WOMANLY enough to admit I would miss big_smile.png DH won't miss, and it might save him wrestling a dying bird, so its worth a shot.

I wasn't thinking of donning the face paint and taking an uzi to the flock lol... As previously posted, it can come in quite handy if you need to cull and can't catch the dumb things lol.. And hey, if you happen to own a gun, and have the skill to use it safely without freaking out, then by all means, whatever is easier for everyone or thing involved gets a least a try in my book wink.png


Edit* this reminds me of why sometimes it's just easier and faster to actually saddle the horse and rope and work one calf, than get the 4 wheelers out and run the whole herd in for one calf... I guess it depends on who you ask, which one is actually more efficient, especially if you lack the skill of owning or riding a horse wink.png
Edited by shortgrass - 11/14/15 at 5:00am
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Egghead_Jr View Post
 

I'll be using the trusty hatchet on the last three culls next week. Will be able to tell if the saddle and wing tip fathers pluck as easy as the pellet pith bird. If not then pithing by pellet will be the preferred method here. It seems some can't wrap minds around 75ft being a non-skilled shot. With the right equipment (scope and bi-pod) there is only patiently waiting for the right shot. Nothing manly or added extra effort to accomplish. If it wasn't raining 50ft would have been the mark but there's no difference in shooting those two distances.

 

The manly thing is to use a blind and take a white tail deer with a .22 pellet via head shot. Now that's bragging rights only by power plant used. The shot if under 150ft not hard with bi-pod and blind. Just a lot of waiting...and waiting...and waiting in the cold and elements for the right one to come along and present itself for the right shot. That's manly.

 

You want manly ? ( or womanly, or kidly for that matter).  I've got the perfect event for you.    The Greene County (Ohio) Fish & Game Association has their annual Groundhogs Day egg shoot,  the first Sunday of February. This is put on by the black powder guys at the club. This shoot is open to anyone, providing they are shooting a muzzleloader, firing a single patched round ball, with open iron sights. No scopes, shaders, or peep sights. 

 

For fee of $20 last year, which includes a good hot lunch, you get the privilege, when your number is called, to come to the firing line and attempt to shoot a chicken egg (pretty good facsimile of a chicken head, size wise )  suspended from a string at 20 yards. Now this is standing offhand shooting, (no bench, no rest, no bi-pod). If you break your 20 yard egg, you get to try the 30 yard egg next time up. If you miss, you shoot at the 20 yard egg again next round. There are a line of eggs suspended at 20, 30, 40, and 50 yards. For every egg you break, they will give you a playing card that is redeemable for a whole frozen chicken at the end of the shoot. The actual firing line is covered, but you are out in the elements for the most part.  There have been several years where we have had snow, try picking out a white egg against a snow background (some years they will give the 50 yard eggs a touch of spray paint if it's a cloudy day).  

 

Let me tell you a event like this will separate the shooters from the bangers.

"It just goes to show you, you don't have to be crazy to raise  Cornish,...................... but it helps."      Lewis Strait
Reply
"It just goes to show you, you don't have to be crazy to raise  Cornish,...................... but it helps."      Lewis Strait
Reply
post #35 of 35
The adult air rifles and pellets currently available today are well up to the task of killing a chicken. Or coon, possom or feral cats also. I have a gamo and if one did not know it looks feels and is the same size as my .17hmr
Edited by sdm111 - 11/14/15 at 6:15am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Meat Birds ETC
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Meat Birds ETC › Dispatching with head shot. Anyone do it?